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    • MannDude

      Current state of vpsBoard   02/04/2017

      Dear vpsBoard members and guests:

      Over the last year or two vpsBoard activity and traffic has dwindled. I have had a change of career and interests, and as such am no longer an active member of the web hosting industry.

      Due to time constraints and new interests I no longer wish to continue to maintain vpsBoard. The web site will remain only as an archive to preserve and showcase some of the great material, guides, and industry news that has been generated by members, some of which I remain in contact to this very day and now regard as personal friends.

      I want to thank all of our members who helped make vpsBoard the fastest growing industry forum. In it's prime it was an active and ripe source of activity, news, guides and just general off-topic banter and fun.

      I wish all members and guests the very best, whether it be with your business or your personal projects.

      -MannDude

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Found 3 results

  1. The U.S. Supreme Court quietly OK'd a rule change last Thursday that will allow the government to obtain a warrant and remotely hack into ANY computer or smartphone that has anonymity software installed on it (VPN, Tor browser, etc) and the devices of anyone who has tried to conceal their location for privacy reasons (e.g. if you turn off the location data for smartphone apps for privacy reasons your phone can be searched under these new rules) . Congress still has to approve it, but... the proposed rule change: http://www.supremecourt.gov/orders/courtorders/frcr16_8mad.pdf EFF article: https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2016/04/rule-41-little-known-committee-proposes-grant-new-hacking-powers-government
  2. Excellent security dev here done by this gent to show weakness in Tor. Simply said, bits of data available even with Tor bundled browser originating from mouse and other hardware. Enough to make you think plausible to use such to identify user as being the same user seen elsewhere. Over time, who knows more data and more screwed. Screams for more emphasis in general on dumping javascript and severely limiting viewing methods if you are sane and inclined to care about being profiled and silo'd. UberCookie During the last weeks I have been able to fingerprint tor browser users in controlled environments and I think it could be interesting to share all the findings for further discussion and to improve tor browser. All the provided fingerprinting methods are based on javascript (enabled by default in tor browser as of today). I have created a quick and dirty PoC called UberCookie available as a demo here: Try ubercookie : http://jcarlosnorte.com/assets/ubercookie/ Source: http://jcarlosnorte.com/security/2016/03/06/advanced-tor-browser-fingerprinting.html
  3. Proposed faster, more secure alternative to Tor: ABSTRACT We present HORNET, a system that enables high-speed end-to-end anonymous channels by leveraging next generation network architectures. HORNET is designed as a low-latency onion routing system that operates at the network layer thus enabling a wide range of applications. Our system uses only symmetric cryptography for data forwarding yet requires no per-flow state on intermediate nodes. This design enables HORNET nodes to process anonymous traffic at over 93 Gb/s. HORNET can also scale as required, adding minimal processing overhead per additional anonymous channel. We discuss design and implementation details, as well as a performance and security evaluation. research paper, 15 pages: http://arxiv.org/pdf/1507.05724v1.pdf