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      Current state of vpsBoard   02/04/2017

      Dear vpsBoard members and guests:

      Over the last year or two vpsBoard activity and traffic has dwindled. I have had a change of career and interests, and as such am no longer an active member of the web hosting industry.

      Due to time constraints and new interests I no longer wish to continue to maintain vpsBoard. The web site will remain only as an archive to preserve and showcase some of the great material, guides, and industry news that has been generated by members, some of which I remain in contact to this very day and now regard as personal friends.

      I want to thank all of our members who helped make vpsBoard the fastest growing industry forum. In it's prime it was an active and ripe source of activity, news, guides and just general off-topic banter and fun.

      I wish all members and guests the very best, whether it be with your business or your personal projects.

      -MannDude

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  1. Figured this thread could be a handy resource for everyone at all skill-levels. Sometimes you just want to copy and paste a command you've used a hundred times (DD-tests, for example) or are just having a brain fart and forgot how to do something. Well... this thread is for you, my friend! Let's get started! I'm just going to start off with the absolute basics, was planning I'd do several of these and then add more to this post as people respond with additional ones. By the way, the outputs of the commands I show I've done on my Raspberry Pi running Debian on my local network. General Commands > The Basics > All Distributions Uptime Command: uptime Shows the uptime of a VPS, output example below: [email protected]:~# uptime 16:11:59 up 12 days, 8:10, 1 user, load average: 0.08, 0.03, 0.05 Free memory Command free -m Shows the available free memory on your Linux system. Read here for more: http://www.linuxatemyram.com/ [email protected]:~# free -m total used free shared buffers cached Mem: 438 379 58 0 49 213 -/+ buffers/cache: 117 321 Swap: 0 0 0 Processes and resources used command: top Realtime process and resource usage. You can see your load average, uptime, and processes that are consuming system resources. To exit 'top', just hit 'Q'. You can CTRL + M to sort the processes according to their memory usage from highest to lowest, which can come in handy in figuring out what is using up your RAM. (Thanks [member=wcypierre] for that tip) [email protected]:~# top top - 16:16:59 up 12 days, 8:15, 1 user, load average: 0.00, 0.01, 0.05 Tasks: 65 total, 1 running, 64 sleeping, 0 stopped, 0 zombie %Cpu(s): 0.7 us, 0.7 sy, 0.0 ni, 98.7 id, 0.0 wa, 0.0 hi, 0.0 si, 0.0 st KiB Mem: 448776 total, 389568 used, 59208 free, 50916 buffers KiB Swap: 0 total, 0 used, 0 free, 218484 cached PID USER PR NI VIRT RES SHR S %CPU %MEM TIME+ COMMAND 17744 root 20 0 3112 1304 924 R 1.0 0.3 0:00.27 top 2081 mysql 20 0 294m 47m 5320 S 0.3 10.8 75:16.16 mysqld 1 root 20 0 2100 676 576 S 0.0 0.2 0:37.37 init 2 root 20 0 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.10 kthreadd 3 root 20 0 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:07.65 ksoftirqd/0 4 root 20 0 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.01 kworker/0:0 5 root 0 -20 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 kworker/0:0H 6 root 20 0 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 2:02.08 kworker/u:0 7 root 0 -20 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 kworker/u:0H 8 root 0 -20 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 khelper 9 root 20 0 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 kdevtmpfs 10 root 0 -20 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 netns 12 root 20 0 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.25 bdi-default 13 root 0 -20 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 kblockd 14 root 20 0 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.22 khubd 15 root 0 -20 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 rpciod 16 root 20 0 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.66 khungtaskd 17 root 20 0 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:08.23 kswapd0 18 root 20 0 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 fsnotify_mark 19 root 0 -20 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 nfsiod 20 root 0 -20 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 crypto 27 root 0 -20 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 kthrotld 28 root 1 -19 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 VCHIQ-0 29 root 1 -19 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 VCHIQr-0 30 root 0 -20 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 VCHIQs-0 31 root 0 -20 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 iscsi_eh 32 root 0 -20 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 dwc_otg 33 root 0 -20 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 DWC Notificatio 35 root 0 -20 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 deferwq 36 root 20 0 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 kworker/u:2 37 root 20 0 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 6:29.95 mmcqd/0 38 root 0 -20 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:04.70 kworker/0:1H 39 root 20 0 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:22.44 jbd2/mmcblk0p2- 40 root 0 -20 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 ext4-dio-unwrit 153 root 20 0 2744 980 608 S 0.0 0.2 0:00.32 udevd 235 root 0 -20 0 0 0 S 0.0 0.0 0:00.00 bcm2708_spi.0 1371 root 20 0 4852 2280 568 S 0.0 0.5 0:00.23 dhclient 1574 root 20 0 28060 1576 1064 S 0.0 0.4 0:03.93 rsyslogd 1609 root 20 0 2248 844 672 S 0.0 0.2 0:05.02 cron 1717 root 20 0 1712 556 460 S 0.0 0.1 0:00.13 mysqld_safe 1899 root 20 0 6168 1040 620 S 0.0 0.2 0:00.12 sshd 2082 root 20 0 1804 608 532 S 0.0 0.1 0:00.01 logger 2174 root 20 0 2200 708 588 S 0.0 0.2 0:00.01 getty 2175 root 20 0 2200 708 588 S 0.0 0.2 0:00.01 getty 2176 root 20 0 2200 708 588 S 0.0 0.2 0:00.01 getty 2177 root 20 0 2200 708 588 S 0.0 0.2 0:00.01 getty 2178 root 20 0 2200 708 588 S 0.0 0.2 0:00.01 getty 2179 root 20 0 2200 708 588 S 0.0 0.2 0:00.01 getty 2804 root 20 0 36296 3520 1252 S 0.0 0.8 1:40.49 php5-fpm Check disk space used and available command: df -h This will check available space on your filesystem. Your output will likely look different depending on the configuration of your server. [email protected]:~# df -h Filesystem Size Used Avail Use% Mounted on rootfs 7.3G 3.7G 3.6G 51% / /dev/root 7.3G 3.7G 3.6G 51% / devtmpfs 212M 0 212M 0% /dev tmpfs 44M 196K 44M 1% /run tmpfs 5.0M 0 5.0M 0% /run/lock tmpfs 88M 0 88M 0% /run/shm Change Directory Command: cd /path/to/directory This will change the location of the directory your browsing. In the example above, simply change the path to the directory in which you need to change to. For example, if you needed to move to '/var/www', you would type 'cd /var/www' [email protected]:~# cd /var/www [email protected]:/var/www# List directory content command: ls Now that you've moved to the directory of your choice, you may want to get a list of the content from within that directory. Simply enter the 'ls' command. You should see something like: [email protected]:/var/www# ls bill_murray.jpg check.php damncat.jpg index.php logo.png logs phpinfo.php phpmyadmin test vpsboard Make Directory command: mkdir ./mynewdirectory The command above will create the directory 'mynewdirectory' in whatever directory you are currently in. Maybe you want to go deeper than that, so use the following the command: mkdir -p ./mynewdirectory/test/testing The command above not only creates the directory but also all that follows it. Move a file command: mv test.txt ./testdirectory The above command will the file 'test.txt' to the directory 'testdirectory'. Pretty straight forward. Change password command: passwd This will change the password for the user you are logged in as. For example, if you are logged in as the root password it's very good practice to change your password immediately. You will be prompted to type in your password, and asked to retype it. Your password will not show in the screen. Output will be similar to below: [email protected]:~# passwd Enter new UNIX password: Retype new UNIX password: passwd: password updated successfully Check the CPU information command: cat /proc/cpuinfo This command will tell you information about the CPU your provider uses for the VPS node you are on. Thank you for submitting this one. [email protected]:~$ cat /proc/cpuinfo processor : 0 vendor_id : GenuineIntel cpu family : 6 model : 42 model name : Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU E31230 @ 3.20GHz stepping : 7 cpu MHz : 3192.748 cache size : 4096 KB fdiv_bug : no hlt_bug : no f00f_bug : no coma_bug : no fpu : yes fpu_exception : yes cpuid level : 13 wp : yes flags : fpu vme de pse tsc msr pae mce cx8 apic sep mtrr pge mca cmov pat pse36 clflush mmx fxsr sse sse2 ss syscall nx rdtscp lm constant_tsc up arch_perfmon pni pclmulqdq ssse3 cx16 sse4_1 sse4_2 x2apic popcnt aes xsave avx hypervisor lahf_lm bogomips : 6385.49 clflush size : 64 cache_alignment : 64 address sizes : 40 bits physical, 48 bits virtual Check memory information command: cat /proc/meminfo Likely not as used as often as the check CPU info command above, but can come in handy. Thank you for submitting this one. [email protected]:~$ cat /proc/meminfo MemTotal: 254828 kB MemFree: 9012 kB Buffers: 45764 kB Cached: 140528 kB SwapCached: 1036 kB Active: 139832 kB Inactive: 88016 kB Active(anon): 19448 kB Inactive(anon): 22164 kB Active(file): 120384 kB Inactive(file): 65852 kB Unevictable: 0 kB Mlocked: 0 kB HighTotal: 0 kB HighFree: 0 kB LowTotal: 254828 kB LowFree: 9012 kB SwapTotal: 496632 kB SwapFree: 490712 kB Dirty: 216 kB Writeback: 0 kB AnonPages: 40804 kB Mapped: 11764 kB Shmem: 56 kB Slab: 12616 kB SReclaimable: 8924 kB SUnreclaim: 3692 kB KernelStack: 640 kB PageTables: 700 kB NFS_Unstable: 0 kB Bounce: 0 kB WritebackTmp: 0 kB CommitLimit: 624044 kB Committed_AS: 229688 kB VmallocTotal: 765952 kB VmallocUsed: 5628 kB VmallocChunk: 752772 kB HardwareCorrupted: 0 kB HugePages_Total: 0 HugePages_Free: 0 HugePages_Rsvd: 0 HugePages_Surp: 0 Hugepagesize: 4096 kB DirectMap4k: 12280 kB DirectMap4M: 249856 kB Stop/Start/Restart (most) services: service [service name] [stop/start/restart/reload/status] OR /etc/init.d/[service name] [stop/start/restart/reload/status] The examples below will use both methods to start/stop/status Nginx and MySQL as it's what is running on my Raspberry Pi right now. [email protected]:~# service nginx restart Restarting nginx: nginx. [email protected]:~# service nginx status [ ok ] nginx is running. [email protected]:~# /etc/init.d/nginx stop Stopping nginx: nginx. [email protected]:~# /etc/init.d/nginx start Starting nginx: nginx. [email protected]:~# /etc/init.d/mysql status [info] /usr/bin/mysqladmin Ver 8.42 Distrib 5.5.31, for debian-linux-gnu on armv7l Copyright (c) 2000, 2013, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle Corporation and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners. Server version 5.5.31-0+wheezy1 Protocol version 10 Connection Localhost via UNIX socket UNIX socket /var/run/mysqld/mysqld.sock Uptime: 12 days 16 hours 14 min 34 sec Threads: 1 Questions: 24062 Slow queries: 0 Opens: 1532 Flush tables: 1 Open tables: 293 Queries per second avg: 0.021. Thanks [member=wcypierre] for sharing. Change File Permissions command: chmod 755 file-or-directory Need to change the file or folder permissions? Do it quickly via SSH! The example below shows me simply changing the permissions of the directory 'testdir' to 755. Thanks [member=wcypierre] for sharing. [email protected]:/var/www# chmod 755 testdir [email protected]:/var/www# Please contribute to this thread! If you wish to contribute, I'll add your responses to this original posting so all commands are in one post for easy retrieval and use. I'll link to your profile or response to give credit where it is due.
  2. Subnet Labs is looking for technical writers to write and submit unique guides and tutorials to expand our knowledgebase. Requirements: Must be written in correct English with proper grammar Must be fully unique and cannot have been posted elsewhere Must be on a topic not already posted (series are allowed) Screenshots or terminal output provided Proper descriptions given and fully explained Must be Linux based To get an example of what we are expecting you can visit the knowledgebase: http://impactvps.com/knowledgebase/ Articles will be posted under your name and you will be given credit. Payment: $25 per article (via paypal) or $50 account credit Contact alex[at]subnetlabs.com with any questions or to submit an article
  3. There are a wide range of server and network monitoring software available out there. Just to name a few, you have Munin, Nagios/Icinga, Zabbix, PRTG, and of course ServerStatus by Mojeda and Mun. All those alternatives are fantastic. I could talk about the key benefits of every single monitoring software. However, for this tutorial we'll be jumping into something more general: Observium. Observium is "an autodiscovering network monitoring platform supporting a wide range of hardware platforms and operating systems..." While Observium's main focus is network monitoring, it also includes some hardware monitoring components available making it a pretty well-rounded monitoring platform. If you're already an Observium veteran, then fantastic! At the very bottom I'll be including some minor changes to the configs and additional modules I'm using in addition to Observium. Feel free to take a gander if you wish. Before we start, shoutout to @mitgib for getting me started on this several years ago when I was first fiddling around with monitoring systems! You're the man! The contents of this tutorial will be broken down into multiple posts due to certain limitations. We'll start with setting up the Observium server, setting up the Observium client, then end with minor tweaks and additional modules available. However, this tutorial will not touch upon the Unix Agent since... ehh... I think it's incredibly finicky and there's not a whole lot of documentation available. The instructions for the Observium Server is also available here on Observium's Wiki. Observium Server Jumping right in, we're going to be install Observium on a Debian 7 server. This is because Observium is actually developed on Ubuntu and Debian systems. However, RHEL and CentOS instructions are available here for those of you who are interested, and for the monitoring portion we'll include instructions on how to monitor RHEL and CentOS Servers. Just note Observium doesn't provide assistance on RHEL/CentOS or any other installations that aren't Ubuntu or Debian. For the purpose of this tutorial, we're going to assume you're running as the root user (because permission and whatnot). Begin by running: apt-get update While it may sound trivial, you want to download the latest package lists from the repositories. Anyways now install the packages required to run Observium: apt-get install libapache2-mod-php5 php5-cli php5-mysql php5-gd php5-mcrypt php5-json php-pear snmp fping mysql-server mysql-client python-mysqldb rrdtool subversion whois mtr-tiny ipmitool graphviz imagemagick Observium runs on top of Apache, MySQL, PHP, RRD, and NetSNMP (as well as Graphviz and fping). During the package installation process, you're going to receive a prompt to provide the MySQL Root password. Provide a secure password since that's pretty important and make sure you don't forget it! Create the directory Observium is going to operate out of: mkdir -p /opt/observium && cd /opt For the purpose of this tutorial, we're going to be using the Community/Open Source Edition of Observium. Download and unpack it. wget http://www.observium.org/observium-community-latest.tar.gz tar zxvf observium-community-latest.tar.gz You're going to have a new folder in your /opt/ folder named observium. Change to that folder: cd observium Login to the MySQL Command Line by typing: mysql -u root -p Provide the MySQL Root Password you set earlier. From here you'll notice the mysql>. This is the MySQL shell. From here, we're going to be creating our database and assigning a new user all permissions to the new database. From the MySQL Shell, enter: https://paste.ee/p/mr1WyLink (Note: Moved to Paste.ee due to IPB not accepting SQL Commands) Now exit the MySQL Shell by typing: exit Now we'll find ourselves back in Bash and in /opt/observium folder. Lets copy the default configuration and edit it for our system. cp config.php.default config.php nano config.php Update the config.php file with the proper MySQL database information. Let's setup the default schema for the MySQL Database: php includes/update/update.php We're going to create the directory Observium will store it's logs. In addition, we'll also be creating the directory to store the RRD data files as well as modify the permissions: mkdir logs mkdir rrd chown www-data:www-data rrd Now this tutorial is assuming your server will only be running Observium for the webserver. This can be modified by using vHosts, however that's outside the scope of this tutorial. Open the default apache configuration file: nano /etc/apache2/sites-available/default and I'd suggest changing it to this: <VirtualHost *:80> ServerAdmin [email protected] DocumentRoot /opt/observium/html <Directory /> Options FollowSymLinks AllowOverride None </Directory> <Directory /opt/observium/html/> Options Indexes FollowSymLinks MultiViews AllowOverride All Order allow,deny allow from all </Directory> ErrorLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/error.log LogLevel warn CustomLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/access.log combined ServerSignature On </VirtualHost> Note: For those of you who are using Ubuntu 14.04, use this Apache2 Config... Spoiler <VirtualHost *:80> ServerAdmin [email protected] DocumentRoot /opt/observium/html <Directory /> Options FollowSymLinks AllowOverride None </Directory> <Directory /opt/observium/html/> Options Indexes FollowSymLinks MultiViews AllowOverride All Require all granted </Directory> ErrorLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/error.log LogLevel warn CustomLog ${APACHE_LOG_DIR}/access.log combined ServerSignature On </VirtualHost> With the apache2 config files edited, we're going to enable a few modules. Enable the PHP mcrypt module: php5enmod mcrypt Now enable the Apache module rewrite to "prettify" Observium's URLs: a2enmod rewrite apache2ctl restart Now add the administrator account (level 10) to Observium: cd /opt/observium ./adduser.php <username> <password> 10 Finally, setup the cronjob so that it discovers new hardware and polls our servers regularly by: nano /etc/cron.d/observium and entering this as the contents: 33 */6 * * * root /opt/observium/discovery.php -h all >> /dev/null 2>&1 */5 * * * * root /opt/observium/discovery.php -h new >> /dev/null 2>&1 */5 * * * * root /opt/observium/poller-wrapper.py 2 >> /dev/null 2>&1 Note: The last line of the above cronjob shows "/opt/observium/poller-wrapper.py 2". Older versions of Observium used the outdated poller.php which only created a single poller instance. This was great for initial testing or just a low number of servers, but for a large volume of servers this wasn't enough. poller-wrapper.py was then included with more recent Observium installations which created however many processes defined (in this case, 2). Change the number after poller-wrapper.py to the number of cores or instances you wish to run/use (e.g. for a VPS with four CPUs you can change the number to 4). Great! You've installed Observium Server! Now point your browser to http://<Server IP> and be on your way! Observium Client Observium mainly utilizes two types of pollers, SNMP and the Unix Agent. Only SNMP will be covered in this tutorial. The Unix Agent can/will be featured in a future post, or someone else can do it who knows. This tutorial will help you install and configure SNMP for CentOS, RHEL, Debian, and Ubuntu servers. This tutorial will not help you configure SNMP for Windows Server or other clients, however there are resources available to help you with that. To start, install the SNMPD package: For CentOS and RHEL: yum install net-snmp net-snmp-libs net-snmp-utils For Debian and Ubuntu: apt-get install snmpd To make life easier, we're simply going to scrap the default SNMPd Configurations: echo "" > /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf Now open the blank SNMPd configuration: nano /etc/snmp/snmpd.conf Enter the following configurations: rocommunity COMMUNITYNAME <OBSERVIUM SERVER IP> syslocation LOCATION syscontact [email protected] operates with the community strings, therefore you can change COMMUNITYNAME to something else (a single word though, no spaces or punctuations are accepted). For the purpose of this tutorial I'll be using vpsBoard. After you type in the community name enter your server IP (to prevent reflection attacks). syslocation is metadata used by Observium and other snmp services. Under LOCATION, enter the System's physical location, for the purpose of this tutorial I'll be using "Dallas, Texas, United States". syscontact is additional metadata required by SNMP. Frequently I just enter one of my own email addresses. In the spoilers is a sample configuration of snmpd.conf. Spoiler rocommunity vpsBoard 8.8.8.8 syslocation Dallas, Texas, United States syscontact [email protected] With the SNMPd configurations done, we have to restart the service! service snmpd restart We're not out of the woods yet! Make sure you check on the Firewall to allow Incoming UDP on Port 161! Simply for tutorial's sake, here's the IPtables for it: iptables -I INPUT -p udp --dport 161 -j ACCEPT Congrats! You've setup SNMP properly on the client server! Time to have Observium monitor it. Go into Observium's web interface (http://<Observium Server IP>). Login, and from the navigations go Devices -> Add Device. Enter the information you've configured SNMP to listen for (in this case, my sample configuration): Press "Add Device" and then wait for the next cron to run. Congratulations! You've added a server to your Observium installation! Now wait for data collection to occur! Here's a sample of one of my utility server (BuyVM VPS). Spoiler What Else? So that's the tutorial for the vanilla Observium installation. However, I personally recommend these minor changes to help with your use of Observium. Timeout Configuration Observium was originally created for ISPs and to monitor networks, not servers. Therefore, vanilla Observium has almost no tolerance for even the smallest network blip (such as a single packet not making it to the destination). So to help with that, we're going to add a few extra lines to the config file. Open up the configuration file: nano /opt/observium/config.php Add the following to the end of the configuration file: // Timeout Config $config['snmp']['timeout'] = 20; // timeout in seconds $config['snmp']['retries'] = 5; // how many times to retry the query $config['ping']['retries'] = 10; // How many times to retry ping $config['ping']['timeout'] = 1500; // Timeout in milliseconds The descriptions are pretty straight forward. With this configuration, Observium will now continually retry polling the server until a predetermined number of times before considering it "down". This is especially helpful if you have set Observium to email you during server downtimes (Note: You can enable this by editing the config.php file and installing sendmail or configuring smiliar mail services on the server). External Application Integration - Collectd So Observium is pretty awesome that it can also integrate with External Applications such as smokeping, RANCID, syslog, etc. For this tutorial I'm simply going to address Collectd, but a full list is available here. Please note the application monitoring section (such as monitoring Apache, nginx, MySQL, etc.) of Observium requires the Unix Agent which, again, is not covered in this tutorial (but maybe in the future). Collectd is "a daemon which collects system performance statistics periodically and provides mechanisms to store the values in a variety of ways, for example in RRD files." To be perfectly honest, it's very similar to the data collected by the SNMP poller, however Collectd comes with numerous plugins you can also monitor (and therefore monitor with Observium). Pretty awesome and keeps your life simpler. There's two parts to Collectd that we have to consider for Observium. The server and the client. Let's begin with the Server. Collectd Server For the server, install collectd: For CentOS and RHEL: Collectd is unavailable in RHEL and CentOS repositories, therefore you can either download the collectd RPM from collectd's website or build from the source package. Building from source or downloading the RPM and installing from collectd's website is outside the scope of this tutorial. However there are resources available online that can help you with installing collectd on CentOS and RHEL servers. For Debian and Ubuntu: apt-get install collectd Once you have collectd installed, edit the collectd configuration file at /etc/collectd/collectd.conf. nano /etc/collectd/collectd.conf Configure that file in any way you see fit, however make sure hostname and the network plugin is loaded. Observium watches for the hostname when determining if the server has collectd enabled: Hostname "observium.tutorial.vpsboard" LoadPlugin network <Plugin network> Listen "0.0.0.0" "25826" </Plugin> Restart the collectd service: service collectd restart Now we're going to have to edit Observium's configuration file to tell it where collectd has the RRD files. First, open config.php: nano /opt/observium/config.php Add the following configuration argument: $config['collectd_dir'] = "/mnt/rrdcached/db/collectd/"; That's it! The collectd tab should automatically appear for any servers that collectd is receiving the graphs for (assuming the hostnames match). Collectd Client The client and the server are very similar. The only major difference is the network plugin configuration. For CentOS and RHEL: Collectd is unavailable in RHEL and CentOS repositories, therefore you can either download the collectd RPM from collectd's website or build from the source package. Building from source or downloading the RPM and installing from collectd's website is outside the scope of this tutorial. However there are resources available online that can help you with installing collectd on CentOS and RHEL servers. For Debian and Ubuntu: apt-get install collectd Once you have collectd installed, edit the collectd configuration file at /etc/collectd/collectd.conf. nano /etc/collectd/collectd.conf Configure that file in any way you see fit, however make sure hostname and the network plugin is loaded. Observium watches for the hostname when determining if the server has collectd enabled: Hostname "observium.tutorial.vpsboard" LoadPlugin network <Plugin network> Listen "1.2.3.4" "25826" </Plugin> The IP (1.2.3.4) is the IP of the Observium Server, not the IP of the server being monitored! Restart the collectd service: service collectd restartThat's it! The collectd tab should automatically appear for any servers that collectd is receiving the graphs for (assuming the hostnames match). Final Thoughts Hope you've enjoyed this giant crash-course on Observium! It doesn't cover everything about it but it covers majority of it. If you have any questions, comments, or concerns feel free to reply. If I don't get to them then I'm sure someone else will come along to help! If you have any awesome changes to your Observium installation feel free to let us know here!
  4. Many a time we've seen threads arise due to 'poor support' and slow turnaround times. Whilst there's the unavoidable fact that the provider can be slow to respond, it's always a good idea to make their understanding of your problems as clear as possible. Keep the upper hand by giving them all the tools they need to resolve your ticket as quickly as possible. These pointers are written from my own experiences with receiving support and giving support. 1. Read Their Terms Of Service It's important for you to get a grasp on what you can/can't expect from your provider. Although you should do it before ordering services, have another read through just to make sure your request is reasonable. The vast majority of providers on this forum are unmanaged which means besides the hardware and network aspects of your server, you're on your own. If you're having an issue with a particular piece of software, they'll be unable to help you however may point you in the right direction to get help. Better still, you can always ask on forums like this when you're having an issue. Generally speaking, people are pretty helpful in diagnosing, troubleshooting and resolving server related problems. 2. Appropriate Ticket Priority & Title Although your problem may be annoying you, unless the server is completely offline refrain from using 'High Priority'. Questions regarding upgrades, downgrades and cancellations should realistically be placed under the 'Low Priority' category. Performance issues, depending on the severity should be Low/Medium priority. Try and keep down to a few words, 'Slow Network Throughput', 'High Disk Latency' and 'Service Cancellation' are directly relevant to the problem at hand. Y U NO MAKE HAPPY' probably won't be too helpful, neither will 'YOU'RE LOSING ME MONEY'. 3. Clear & Polite Language Although their service might be a tad awful at the time, you'll be talking to human beings. Remember that how you interact with them will influence how they interact with you. Try to be courteous, don't give them an excuse to lower the priority of your ticket. If English isn't your native language, it may be a good idea to first attempt to articulate your problem in English, but write the same below in your native language. If the employees are having trouble understanding you, a quick Google Translate might be able to clear things up. 4. Provide Relevant Information Provide evidence for your problem - This may be in the form of benchmarks, traceroutes or outputs from other statistic generating programmes. Also, make it clear that it's an ongoing and not a sporadic problem by generating your evidence at different times. 5. Be Patient If you're dealing with an unmanaged service, understand that there may be a wait until you get a response. Response times may be dependent on your timezone, the provider's timezone, whether it's the weekend or not, public holidays, etc. 6. Be Appreciative As pathetic as it may seem, it's important to maintain your relationship with your provider. If you're a nuisance, they'll remember it. In the future you may really need them on your side, for example if you're the victim of a DDoS attack; don't give them another reason to kick you out. If I've missed anything, give me a buzz and I'll add it on.
  5. Good evening members of this forum! As you might have noticed from my signature I write and maintain a site called LowEndGuide.com. The reason for this post is that I updated the theme and layout of the page today/tonight (and it's really late). I have a tendency to miss the most obvious when I'm tired so I am interested to hear from you. Because I know you are brutally honest. What are your opinions about the new layout, with categories on the left side instead of the look of a blog with posts added one after each other. I still have that look, if someone would be interested, the link is on the top of the page. Ignore the spelling mistakes and grammar at this point, the guides are old (new ones will be published soon, was trying to get this done first). Or if you have nothing better to do, feel free to comment on my spelling and grammar. For you who have visited the site with the old look, is this better or worse? What can I do to improve the "feeling". Change of colours perhaps? Another layout? Give me your opinions!!! I'm posting this, right before I go to bed so I will reply tomorrow when I'm awake again. Thank you for reading and commenting :) And if this should be somewhere else, smack me over the head and tell me where to put it or move it.