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      Current state of vpsBoard   02/04/2017

      Dear vpsBoard members and guests:

      Over the last year or two vpsBoard activity and traffic has dwindled. I have had a change of career and interests, and as such am no longer an active member of the web hosting industry.

      Due to time constraints and new interests I no longer wish to continue to maintain vpsBoard. The web site will remain only as an archive to preserve and showcase some of the great material, guides, and industry news that has been generated by members, some of which I remain in contact to this very day and now regard as personal friends.

      I want to thank all of our members who helped make vpsBoard the fastest growing industry forum. In it's prime it was an active and ripe source of activity, news, guides and just general off-topic banter and fun.

      I wish all members and guests the very best, whether it be with your business or your personal projects.

      -MannDude
drmike

ARM has legs. Real world use.

82 posts in this topic

58 minutes ago, drmike said:

Which OrangePi did you pick up @KuJoe?  The models are a bit confusing / not obvious...  Did you find a US supplier that ships quick that you can recommend?  Finding the OrangePis is pointing to China and I have no patience with slow boats.

I got the Orange Pi Plus off AliExpress, took 2-3 weeks to get here with the case but since I hadn't had time to play with my other devices anyways it wasn't an issue. The case is a nightmare though, no screws so it's held together with a hope and a prayer pretty much. It took me over an hour to assemble because the protective covers on each side of each piece were nearly impossible to get off without a fine flat head screwdriver and would rip every inch pretty much so I'd need to take the screwdriver to the edge again so now my clear case is pretty scratched up taking the protective covers off of it. If I had to do it all over again I would have kept the covers on or built a case out of LEGOs.

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Ahh that $370 million Israeli company....  Their chips are in a few Synology NAS units, but haven't used anything from them yet.

Their niche seems to be 64-bit ARM + IoT / homes.... With emphasis on multiple gigabit connectivity.  Meh.

I run Gbit all over here unless a device just doesn't pack that on network.   Do I need more?  Probably bonding a few Gbit ports would help on NAS where multiple people are poking at data.  Beyond that, backups would get faster across the LAN.

I am not really feeling this multiple gigabit stuff.  Wireline is only thing that will do it at this time and very niche.  It's region of expensive corporate solutions mired in complexity.  Up there with things like clustering.

ARM is such a cheap cheap area that I wonder why anyone gets into it at this point, unless R&D has something entirely earth shattering. Run of the mill enhancements aren't going to get anyone anywhere.

Meh, I don't see this working for Amazon.

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HP Moonshot: http://www8.hp.com/us/en/products/servers/moonshot/web.html

Moonshot systems are powered by an octa-core, 64-bit ARMv8 CPU (X-Gene) and have M.2 2280 SSDs for storage.

HP ProLiant m400 Server Cartridge: http://www8.hp.com/us/en/products/proliant-servers/product-detail.html?oid=7398907&jumpid=ba_r329_hhoaffiliate&aid=38293&pbid=je6NUbpObpQ&aoid=35252&siteid=je6NUbpObpQ-RKA2OEbyN_6YPg44CyHXiw#!tab=features

Looks like Applied Micro build a quite good ARM core: https://www.apm.com/products/data-center/x-gene-family/x-gene/

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1 hour ago, wlanboy said:

HP Moonshot: http://www8.hp.com/us/en/products/servers/moonshot/web.html

Moonshot systems are powered by an octa-core, 64-bit ARMv8 CPU (X-Gene) and have M.2 2280 SSDs for storage.

HP ProLiant m400 Server Cartridge: http://www8.hp.com/us/en/products/proliant-servers/product-detail.html?oid=7398907&jumpid=ba_r329_hhoaffiliate&aid=38293&pbid=je6NUbpObpQ&aoid=35252&siteid=je6NUbpObpQ-RKA2OEbyN_6YPg44CyHXiw#!tab=features

Looks like Applied Micro build a quite good ARM core: https://www.apm.com/products/data-center/x-gene-family/x-gene/

The Moonshot is a complete piece of crap. It cost us millions of dollars from an outage it caused our whole data center (one device) because their engineers told us they knew what they were doing but didn't (we had HP on-site to configure it). Management spent weeks at their Texas office where the people who created the system are located and they couldn't get it to do what it was designed for and in the end we gave it back (after they spent 6 months trying to do what they advertised).

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7 hours ago, drmike said:

@KuJoe ouch!

As usual, the cost millions... how?

Downtime. I forget the actual figures but the cost analysis of the outage was estimated at over $100 million in losses not including any fines received because of the outage, the loss of income from clients going else where, or the loss of our users who didn't have access to any systems for the duration of the outage.

(Obviously talking about my day job and not Secure Dragon, wouldn't use HP products in our cabinets.)

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On 12/01/2016 at 10:05 PM, KuJoe said:

Downtime. I forget the actual figures but the cost analysis of the outage was estimated at over $100 million in losses not including any fines received because of the outage, the loss of income from clients going else where, or the loss of our users who didn't have access to any systems for the duration of the outage.

(Obviously talking about my day job and not Secure Dragon, wouldn't use HP products in our cabinets.)

Ouch.  That is HUUUUGGE.

HP bias earned or just for the ARM line :) ?  

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10 hours ago, drmike said:

Ouch.  That is HUUUUGGE.

HP bias earned or just for the ARM line :) ?  

We're a mostly HP shop at my day job although we have been buying more and more Cisco UCS hardware (we just spent close to a million bucks on around 70 blades). I prefer Cisco over HP in an enterprise environment but for Secure Dragon I prefer Dell over HP for various reasons. We looked into setting up an ARM cloud for a specific use case for Secure Dragon but decided against it due to costs.

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11 hours ago, KuJoe said:

We're a mostly HP shop at my day job although we have been buying more and more Cisco UCS hardware (we just spent close to a million bucks on around 70 blades). I prefer Cisco over HP in an enterprise environment but for Secure Dragon I prefer Dell over HP for various reasons. We looked into setting up an ARM cloud for a specific use case for Secure Dragon but decided against it due to costs.

ARM would be nice in SD portfolio.   Pricing just is too high on the gear at this point and as you pointed to earlier, vendor solutions for prepackaged is both pricey and limited.

For the next year or two, ARM is still a DIY solution to build / cobble a rackable cluster, unless you have deep pockets and enjoy tax depreciation / need a way to squander cash.

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1 hour ago, souen said:

Just saw this on the ODROID forum, a new model C2 coming in March with 2 GB ram for $40. I probably won't be able to resist getting one.

http://forum.odroid.com/viewtopic.php?f=135&t=18683

Those numbers in that...

The XU4 model still continues to trounce the others and looks pretty nice.  I need to find a deal on an XU4.

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On 2/6/2016 at 2:25 AM, drmike said:

XU4 model still continues to trounce the others

IMHO the XU4 was well worth the investment.  It has completely replaced my home "desktop" with ease.  Email (thunderbird), Web (chromium), Scanning, Printing, touch up of photos (gimp), VPN/RDP to work, mount LAN NAS for extra storage space (smb), watch movies (VLC), listen to music (various), etc...

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Looks like the interesting thing about the C2 is that it's a 64 bit processor, using A57 cores, though still not as fast as the XU4.  Maybe there will be an A72-based follow-on to the XU4 sometime.

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6 hours ago, willie said:

Looks like the interesting thing about the C2 is that it's a 64 bit processor, using A57 cores, though still not as fast as the XU4.  Maybe there will be an A72-based follow-on to the XU4 sometime.

64 bit is the only big take away from the new C2 in my mind.

 

7 hours ago, raj said:

IMHO the XU4 was well worth the investment.  It has completely replaced my home "desktop" with ease.  Email (thunderbird), Web (chromium), Scanning, Printing, touch up of photos (gimp), VPN/RDP to work, mount LAN NAS for extra storage space (smb), watch movies (VLC), listen to music (various), etc...

Glad to see a happy Odroid XU4 case study @raj.  What OS are you running on the XU4 and anything notably broken with it?

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11 hours ago, drmike said:

What OS are you running on the XU4 and anything notably broken with it?

Currently running Odrobian for the XU4 (boot from SD, load root from USB).  I had the same system running on the C1, but it is noticeably faster on the XU4 (for obvious hardware reasons).  Running everything pretty much stock with "desktop" experience applications straight from standard Debian apt-get repositories. Nothing I've installed to give me my standard "desktop" experience turned out to be broken.  

Everything I've plugged in so far has been simply plug-n-play: WD 320GB Passport external USB drive, Kootek USB Wifi Adapter, Insignia wired USB keyboard and mouse, Amazon basics USB powered speakers (via HDMI through monitor 3.5mm out port), 27" Acer LCD display, Galaxy Note 4, etc.

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32 minutes ago, DomainBop said:

 

target market is both IOT and object based storage, ARMv8 1 watt power

http://venturebeat.com/2016/02/21/nxp-unveils-a-small-and-tiny-64-bit-arm-processor-for-the-internet-of-things/

Looks interesting.  1 watt sounds high relative to total envelope of other total solutions.  Hard to guage on ARM these days what is power to CPU vs the rest of the package.

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Figured there might be a few of you who would get a kick  out of this:

som.jpg?w=535&h=468

"What you see above is our first prototype of A20-SOM-NANO with only 30×15 mm this is the smallest A20 System On Module running Linux, Windows, Android and DR-DOS 3.3!

It’s based on the newly released A20M processor which is dual architecture and can run with ARM and x86 instruction set. This makes possible to use all existing software which runs on ARM and x86 platforms, even the old DOS programs can run on Linux and Window bash command prompt without any modification."

 https://olimex.wordpress.com/2016/04/01/world-smallest-system-on-module-with-a20m-released-dual-instruction-set-x86-and-arm-v7-can-run-any-code-in-and-os/

This is pretty freaking cool, not only will this tiny board run ARM instructions, but it will run x86 which means a lot of things just became compatible!!  Pretty cool if you ask me!

 

Cheers!

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33 minutes ago, TheLinuxBug said:

https://olimex.wordpress.com/2016/04/01/world-smallest-system-on-module-with-a20m-released-dual-instruction-set-x86-and-arm-v7-can-run-any-code-in-and-os/

This is pretty freaking cool, not only will this tiny board run ARM instructions, but it will run x86 which means a lot of things just became compatible!!  Pretty cool if you ask me!

Cheers!

Posted on April the 1st... 

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