• Announcements

    • MannDude

      Current state of vpsBoard   02/04/2017

      Dear vpsBoard members and guests:

      Over the last year or two vpsBoard activity and traffic has dwindled. I have had a change of career and interests, and as such am no longer an active member of the web hosting industry.

      Due to time constraints and new interests I no longer wish to continue to maintain vpsBoard. The web site will remain only as an archive to preserve and showcase some of the great material, guides, and industry news that has been generated by members, some of which I remain in contact to this very day and now regard as personal friends.

      I want to thank all of our members who helped make vpsBoard the fastest growing industry forum. In it's prime it was an active and ripe source of activity, news, guides and just general off-topic banter and fun.

      I wish all members and guests the very best, whether it be with your business or your personal projects.

      -MannDude
drmike

OVH intends to ruin the hosting industry.

70 posts in this topic

7 hours ago, graeme said:

Ah, yes. That does seem rather expensive but I suppose the premium is for the load balancing, automatically moving VMs from a failed host, management of the hosts (not the VMs) etc. I have not idea how much of premium that is worth.

 

On 10/14/2016 at 3:38 AM, willie said:

...  I was thinking of the so-called dedicated cloud where you seem to get two midrange dedicated servers for around $500 a month, with the ability to split them into VM's.  I don't remember the exact offering but it was pretty unattractive.

 

 

OVH Private Cloud is powered by VMWARE.

The Private Cloud is a unique solution on the market providing the scalability of the Cloud on a 100% dedicated hardware infrastructure. The virtualization of your infrastructure is done using VMware technology and is fully managed by OVH.
All you need to do now is create unlimited VMs using the vSphere interface!

OVH Dedicated Cloud

MJvR592.jpg

vCenter + vSphere as a service

Enterprise Plus Licence included

AMD Hosts

Up to 2,000 VxLANs (inter VM)

 

DC Starter Pack

  • 2 x AMD Opteron 4386 32 GB RAM
  • 2 x Datastores 300 GB NFS
  • Center + vSphere
  • Licence Enterprise Plus included
  • $573.00/month

https://www.ovh.com/us/dedicated-cloud/

 

OVH SDDC - Software Defined Datacenter

c7SYjsP.jpg

A Software Defined Datacenter pack is comprised of at least 2 INTEL Hosts + 2 datastores or 2 VSAN hosts (soon), and of 4,000 vLAN to deploy your private networks.
Create an unlimited number of VMs and your own network services from the VMware® vSphere hypervisor and NSX.
Resize your infrastructure at any time by adding and deleting resources.

Software Defined Storage, VSAN - VSAN All Flash (SSD) Hosts for extreme performance, configured in RAID. Intel Hosts and NFS datastores also available.

Software Defined Computing , vCenter included - vSphere + Licence Enterprise Plus included to create and manage an unlimited number of VMs on fully dedicated hosts. .

Software Defined Network , NSX included - Firewall, load balancer, security rules… all these features are available from your vSphere.

SDDC Start Pack

  • 2 x Xeon E5-1620v2 32 GB RAM
  • 2 x Datastores 300 GB NFS
  • vCenter + vSphere
  • Licence Enterprise Plus included
  • NSX included
  • $777.00/month

https://www.ovh.com/us/sddc/

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, graeme said:

@fm7 not living up what it should do clearly but no data loss, right? If they did deliver the prices would be be very good, and, even as it is, they are pretty competitive.

Quote

The Ceph cluster is based on 24 servers. each with 12 disks.

...


The main issue is the version of the 17 objects. The objects are in the version 696135'83055746. The version in the Ceph’s metadata is 696135'83055747. So Ceph doesn’t want to start. We’ve forced to forget the bad files but it doesn’t work. Ceph is freezing.

...

4 action plans:

1)
we are patching the tool that can import/export the objects to force the version of the object to 696135'83055747. 1 team is working on this

2)
we are looking how to restart Ceph wihout 17 objects. an another team is working on that.

3)
in the case, nothing works, we will start the Ceph without 6 PG, but it means lost of some data. we don’t know which data would be lost. that is why we lauch a local backup of the data in the case we have to work on it and restore the lost data in the futur. it’s a strategy the « last case ». 1 team is working on that.

4)
we’are preapring the recovery of the data, but we are talking about 120TB. it will be slow, and the backup has 24 hours. 1 team is working on that

Regards,
Octave

 

Quote

we lose 17 objets with 4/8MB each. so 100MB

 

http://travaux.ovh.net/?do=details&id=20636

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@fm7 I am a bit confused about what happened at OVH. So they did not lose data at first, but did lose data trying to fix it?

With regard to the OVH private cloud, I just have no idea what it should cost so I have no idea what the pricing should be. You could set up something similar on a dedi cheaper, but how much work would it be. I am a consumer of VPSs, so I have not idea how much work is involved that this system may save.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, graeme said:

@fm7 I am a bit confused about what happened at OVH. So they did not lose data at first, but did lose data trying to fix it?

They lose 1 HDD at first and then the entire Ceph cluster.due issues on 6 servers -- that Ceph cluster is based on 24 servers. each with 12 disks.

According to Octave's post:

"We think that Ceph was trying to write the data on the failed disk. Ceph has done it on the failed disk and updated the metadata, but Ceph hasn’t done it on the others disks."

Octave's rant:

About 5000 VPS are using this Ceph cluster. The deal is simple : it has to work even if we lose 66.66% of the hosts. Here we lost 1 hard disk [and there are ~300 HDDs in that cluster] and it [Ceph cluster] is broken.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, graeme said:

With regard to the OVH private cloud, I just have no idea what it should cost so I have no idea what the pricing should be. You could set up something similar on a dedi cheaper, but how much work would it be. I am a consumer of VPSs, so I have not idea how much work is involved that this system may save.

It is managed hosting -- shouldn't be compared to unmanaged dedicated prices -- and, if OVH intends to compete with “VMware Cloud on AWS”, I think OVH's Private Cloud is fairly inexpensive.

Said that I have "very little confidence" (none) in OVH -- in need of a VMware server I certainly would buy one from Junaid (Corgi Tech) .

 

 

OVH disaster recovery plan

 

UblEiqW.png

Tarif par VM protégée: 30,00€ HT/mois

 

Octave Klaba / Oles [email protected] Oct 12

#Ovh Plan de Reprise d'Activité Private Cloud @VMwarevSphere @Zerto https://www.ovh.com/fr/private-cloud/pra/ …

 

 

 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

 

[ OVH Asia-Pacific senior adviser, Emmanuel Goutallier]

"... as we move towards a cloud business, it is moving towards a channel-centric model. We are looking to crystalise this strategy by March 2017."

According to Goutallier, the vendor is seeking channel partners that can wrap services around its cloud offering.

...

In the short-term, the company is looking to target SMBs and small enterprises as customers.

“The enterprise play is not for now; it’s for later on," Goutallier stated. "We want to go against Microsoft, Google and AWS."

The company will also soon launch a private cloud offering, that dedicates compute and storage resources to a customer in the OVH cloud - this will be done in partnership with VMware.

Customers can pay as they go, and it depends on their consumption – two key attributes of a public cloud on a hosted private cloud," Goutallier added.

"VMware is a significant provider of virtualisation and when this launches, its partners can bring this offering to market."

With 25 years experience in the channel across Europe and Australia, Goutallier was previously the global vice-president and general manager for managed cloud solutions in Hitachi Data Systems before onboarding OVH.

Some of his other work stints include HP, Deloitte, and Accenture.

The company has also hired Kimberley Plumridge as its Asia-Pacific sales manager, tasked with spearheading OVH’s channel partner program for the region.

Plumridge joins the company from Huawei Technologies, where she served as channel manager following five years working at Telstra Business.

...

http://www.arnnet.com.au/article/608552/european-cloud-infrastructure-provider-ovh-lands-australia/

 

Quote

 

... Dell Inc. subsidiary VMWare Inc., whose representative Hervé Basso said his company had been working with OVH on its North American expansion from the beginning, and looked forward to helping both the company and its customers identify cloud services such as software-defined datacentres that could support them both immediately and in the long run.

“Our partnership started six or seven years ago, when OVH was simply looking for good technology that would instituting a cloud and virtual hosting business,” Basso said. “Since then I have discovered that they are usually the first ones willing to adopt new technology, which sets them a bit apart from other companies in what we call our cloud network.”

Basso said that OVH has become the sort of partner that VMWare involves in its own partnership planning, noting that the latter has already invited the former to several of its virtual cloud network planning sessions this year regarding more than one product offering, and that OVH is always quick to offer valuable feedback.

“I believe our relationship is entering a chapter three,” Basso said. “Chapter one was a kind of mutual discovery… They were a different kind of company and a different type of partner… Chapter two we reinforced the partnership, and OVH made the decision to adopt most of our latest software… and now we are entering chapter three.”

“Both companies are quite mature now, as is the relationship, and based on that maturity we’re expecting to scale the relationship further, starting with OVH’s international expansion,” he said.

http://www.computerdealernews.com/news/ovh-relying-on-channel-partners-to-make-a-splash-in-the-canadian-market/50868

 

 

 

Quote

 

OVH is looking to explode out of Europe as a global player in the data centre and cloud market. To do this it needs improved visibility around the world. By announcing a number of new data centres it is making it clear to customers that it has a global play. As it moves up the revenue stack from SME’s to larger enterprises, this global approach will be well received.

http://www.enterprisetimes.co.uk/2016/10/12/ovh-turns-new-datacentres/

 

 

Quote

 

OVH senior adviser Emmanuel Goutallier said the company didn't deliver any managed services, and expected to deliver at least 50 percent of sales through the channel by March 2017.

"OVH's job and main objective is to offer an infrastructure-as-a-service using baremetal cloud and hosted private cloud products," he said.

http://www.crn.com.au/news/worlds-third-largest-hosting-provider-comes-to-sydney-439446

 

 

Quote

 

Klaba considers his competitors based on the market. In public and private cloud, naturally, OVH competes with Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, and Google’s cloud platform, he said, though he does not see OVH as having competition in the dedicated server space, saying that such would-be competitors as IBM and Rackspace are just getting started, and no U.S. competition in the consolidation market at all.

http://www.itworldcanada.com/article/french-isp-giant-ovh-further-expands-into-the-canadian-market/387278

 

 

"We want to go against Microsoft, Google and AWS" [1]

“We’re already doing large business. When we started in Canada back in 2013 I don’t think we had more than six people, and as we speak we currently employ more than 130.” [2]

"(BHS) now has 30,000 servers and the capacity for more than 350,000." [3]

"Fauquier’s first data center and OVH’s North American headquarters will be housed in a real estate investor Rajai Zumot’s bunker-like, single-story building at 6872 Watson Court. That 84,200-square-foot building and four smaller structures stand on the 8.6-acre parcel. For tax purposes, Fauquier values the property at $2.4 million. OVH hopes to complete purchase the property from Mr. Zumot’s Blue Rock LLC in November." [4]

"Amazon ... its U.S. data center network at about 700 megawatts of IT capacity, with as much as 500 MW of that total focused in US East. The company operates nine data centers in Sterling and six in Ashburn (with three more under construction) as well six in Manassas (with two more in the works). The company also has two data facilities in Chantilly, and is planning to expand its infrastructure into Haymarket in Prince William County.

Amazon standardizes its data centers to house between 50,000 and 80,000 servers. All three of the new Ashburn data centers are 149,000 square feet, as are three of the data centers COPT has built and leased in Manassas." [5]

 

[1] OVH Asia-Pacific senior adviser, Emmanuel Goutallier

[2] OVH’s VP of product and marketing for Canada Cédric Combey

[3] Eric Emin Wood - IT World Canada  - October 11, 2016

[4] Don Del Rosso

[5] Rich Miller

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 15/10/2016 at 9:36 PM, fm7 said:

I have "very little confidence" (none) in OVH

Do you mean that with regard to their entire range of services, of  just these? A lot of people seem happy with their dedis.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Fortunately I'm not one them. :-)

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

When we started in Canada back in 2013 I don’t think we had more than six people, and as we speak we currently employ more than 130.

More welfare destruction economy.  Driving large sums of money and many customers to a single company that fails to invest in workforce or staffing.

130 employees is nothing.  Decent for a small business, but shit vs. customer headcount and revenue.  They have at least 30k servers installed in Canada.   That's an employee per 230+ servers.  Not a good ratio.

Same applies to many of these big vendors and their DCs.  These place often are ghost towns.  I fail to see how investing tax and local subsidies really has payoff.  For one it murders existing smaller competitors. Two it employs fewer people ratio'd vs. customers. Three, outside of utility taxation and some one time permits, there is little upside to local / regional coffers.

One could likely say that these DCs also tap the existing grid, put competition on power and cause rates to go up to local rate payers, instead of down and some instances cause local power company to spend outside of the market to bring generated power in.

Long term I can see Canada regretting giving OVH subsidies and inviting them in. Perhaps the whole France tie in and being Montreal area is somehow acceptable.  Financial investment in DCs needs radically changed with emphasis on fostering existing local/regional businesses.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Small businesses do not count as far as most governments are concerned. Policy is driven by what big business wants. How much corporate welfare can actually be justified by the public good? Subsidies are just more of the same.

I think the ratio is reasonable for the product, and they would certainly be more expensive if they had a lower ratio.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At the end of the day nobody in business likes competition.
What OVH are doing is being competitive in markets that they aren't in at the moment, By doing this there will be unhappy people...

That's business.

If you want to be the best, then you'd better be the best!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@OnACloud I think @drmike has a point about subsidies: competition is good (for the economy as a whole), but competitive pricing through subsidies is usually bad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, graeme said:

@OnACloud I think @drmike has a point about subsidies: competition is good (for the economy as a whole), but competitive pricing through subsidies is usually bad.

I can agree with you there @graeme, @drmike certainly has a point about subsidies. However this is unfortunately happening everywhere at the moment with independents being bought up left right and center in all industries.

I believe however that OVH is not going to 'ruin' the hosting industry.. It's all about making your brand and what you are selling a point of difference between your competitors.

:)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/28/2016 at 4:50 AM, OnACloud said:

I can agree with you there @graeme, @drmike certainly has a point about subsidies. However this is unfortunately happening everywhere at the moment with independents being bought up left right and center in all industries.

I believe however that OVH is not going to 'ruin' the hosting industry.. It's all about making your brand and what you are selling a point of difference between your competitors.

:)

True to a point, but the simple fact of the matter is that a lot of people in this industry are looking for a basic, competent service at a good price - and OVH beats most out in those areas. In no way is OVH perfect, but they have a clear mandate that is very similar to WalMart: Sell in bulk, sell cheap, sell everywhere. Many smaller companies simply cannot compete.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

clear mandate that is very similar to WalMart: Sell in bulk, sell cheap, sell everywhere. Many smaller companies simply cannot compete.

Again, prime example of the problem.

If we removed NAFTA trade deals which Clinton administration passed and similar trade deals and lack of import controls to level the flood gates, well, we wouldn't have had the rise of Walmart.   Incidentally, the Clintons received much financial handouts from the Walton/Walmart family (the very wealthy owners, not the poor workers).

Problem with Walmart isn't cheap, it's about vast majority of the store being MADE IN CHINA.  Meanwhile how many of their employees aren't paid enough to even feed themselves and pushed to the government hand out trough by Walmart corporate?  Tons.

Cheap and availability all over isn't a problem, that's actually a sales / marketing tactic and a decent one.  So is being opened 24 hours.

Walmart exists because of government deals that gut competition.

Same short sighted and selfish deals that fund data center deals of companies already big enough and companies subject to eat the real economy and put masses of people out of work.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, drmike said:

Again, prime example of the problem.

If we removed NAFTA trade deals which Clinton administration passed and similar trade deals and lack of import controls to level the flood gates, well, we wouldn't have had the rise of Walmart.   Incidentally, the Clintons received much financial handouts from the Walton/Walmart family.

Problem with Walmart isn't cheap, it's about vast majority of the store being MADE IN CHINA.  Meanwhile how many of their employees aren't paid enough to even feed themselves and pushed to the government hand out trough by Walmart corporate?  Tons.

Cheap and availability all over isn't a problem, that's actually a sales / marketing tactic and a decent one.  So is being opened 24 hours.

Walmart exists because of government deals that gut competition.

Innovation and providing a fantastic, let's-beat-everyone-else service also takes capital and a fair bit of it. I'd venture to say that it's more difficult for a small company to get hundreds of millions of dollars in loans, investments, and other debts to finance their company. Building on that, deploying a new location for a provider like us - one that owns our own hardware and IPs - is also a major investment, and not something we can do everyday. Certainly not at a competitive scale.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Monopolies and monocultures are built from large wealth stacks and often with the blessing if not conspiring of government.  Government can pretend to be hands off or often inept.  They are anything but such.  Greedy elected hacks padding their nest.  I give you deal, you give me $$$$, corruption.

As the saying long ago went:
Competition is a sin.

This is to say, the system is one of conspiring and of appearances of competition. This is in a fixed market where everything has 'matured' into situation where 80% or more of the market is controlled by a handful of companies.

Look around at everything you buy... How many computer companies are there making hardware?  Really there are a few mega corps making all the gear and more middle layer marketing companies rebadging the stuff as their own.  How many TV manufacturers?  Do we even have one left in the United States?  Probably only assembly being done in the US.  Look at food, at building materials, at energy, etc.  It has become the land of many billion dollar mega corps concentrating everything. Total domination.

That said, while I like the corporate financial 'should be there stability' of these McCorporation companies,  I refuse to buy from them.  Never have bought from OVH and never will.  Haven't stepped into a Walmart in 5 years I'd say.  I don't buy mega brand things and especially not at great cost.  Afterall, why should I, they are only selling commodity and usually inferior goods of limited durability.

We all need to do our part to vote with our dollars.  I support small business. Small businesses built this country and there are far more small businesses (even though growth of small businesses and failures in the past decade hasn't been good).

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, drmike said:

Look around at everything you buy... How many computer companies are there making hardware?  Really there are a few mega corps making all the gear and more middle layer marketing companies rebadging the stuff as their own.  How many TV manufacturers?  Do we even have one left in the United States?  Probably only assembly being done in the US.  Look at food, at building materials, at energy, etc.  It has become the land of many billion dollar mega corps concentrating everything. Total domination.

 

The OTT Firms Rule Under the Waves

Facebook and Google attracted headlines earlier this month over their plans to jointly build a 120Tbit/s subsea cable across the north Pacific.

...

The Pacific Light Cable Network (PLCN), which will run from Los Angeles to Hong Kong at a cost of approximately $400 million, is due for completion in 2018.

But it's part of a bigger story about the OTT players' growing dominance of the global capacity business.

The big Internet firms account for most of the new cable builds and are about to overtake operators as the biggest carriers of bandwidth.

According to TeleGeography Inc., they already carry most of the traffic on the Atlantic route.

That's not including the massive MAREA cable, now being built by Facebook and Microsoft Corp.. The 160Tbit/s link will land in Bilbao, Spain, south of the traditional cable routes, to provide direct access to continental Europe.

TeleGeography research director Alan Mauldin estimates that private networks account for 39% of global traffic today and will likely account for the majority by 2019.

But "it could certainly be sooner," he adds. "The pace of growth these content providers are experiencing is incredible and it's difficult to know how it will trend."

...

... trans-Pacific capacity will be exhausted by the end of 2022. A capacity crunch is highly unlikely, however, and already a number of new systems are under discussion, Mauldin says.

He points out that, despite their growing dominance, the OTT providers still source some capacity from long-haul providers.

However, the problem for the wholesale carriers is that "demand is growing at a slower pace though overall, compared to the content providers' demand."

...

 

Fortune on the high seas

... with cables costing anywhere from $200M to $1B to put in place, only a few companies can afford to do this, and where they decide to place their cables will have a profound impact on how the future of the internet is developed.

...

Whichever companies take advantage of cables laid now stand to reap the rewards for the next decade. Equinix, in particular, has eagerly jumped into the field, announcing its involvement in 12 different projects.

...

“The biggest thing for us here is that the global backbone will point towards our data centers if we continue to execute and win more and more of these cables, which is very good for us and our customers,” said Ihab Tarazi, Equinix CTO.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So I'm one of the people who pre-ordered OVH Singapore.  I guess this just happened.

 

Quote

Hello,
 
You recently pre-ordered a dedicated server from our introductory offers for our new Asia-Pacific zone.
We regret to inform you that we are currently encountering some constraints in setting up these servers. In order to ensure the best level of service possible, we must push back the delivery date of these servers to November 30, 2016.
 
To compensate you for this inconvenience, we would like to offer you a free month of service. This gesture will automatically be applied upon delivery of your server with the expiration date being extended by one month.
 
If you no longer wish to benefit from this introductory offer, you may cancel your pre-order. This can be done from the invoice that you received in your order confirmation email. If you cancel your pre-order you will be fully refunded.
 
We thank you for your understanding and once again, we apologize for the inconvenience.
 
Thank you for your trust.

OVH Team

 

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By DomainBop
      OVH offers users  the choice of using its modified custom Linux kernels or the regular distro's kernel.  Ubuntu's license contains a clause that requires anyone who distributes a modified version of Ubuntu to get approval from Ubuntu and pay a license fee to use the Ubuntu mark. Canonical/Ubuntu wants OVH to pay a licensing fee of 1-2 euros monthly for each installation which over the course of a year would amount to about 1 million euros.  According to the article Canonical (owner of Ubuntu) is also asking Dreamhost, which also uses a modified version of Ubuntu,  to pay a licensing fee.
      (google translate was invented so you could read the French articles I link to) http://www.clubic.com/pro/actualite-e-business/actualite-809784-ubuntu-canonical-payer-ovh.html
    • By fm7
      Redirecting over and over to the login page.
       
      http://travaux.ovh.net/?do=details&id=17229
    • By DomainBop
      If any of you OVH based providers want to set yourself apart from the crowd and be the first to start offering PowerKVM VPS's out of RBX for under $7 monthly I might be interested.  A Power8 OpenStack offering would be even better as long as you keep it under $7  (it's been impossible to find a Power8 VPS since OVH/Runabove ended their Power8 lab).  :P
      ***
      SoYouStart launched a new server line with amazing specs for the price.:
      Virtualization options for Power8 servers: https://www.ibm.com/support/knowledgecenter/linuxonibm/liaam/liaamvirtoptions.htm
      MongoDB and MariaDB already offer Power8 versions so these servers would be great for heavy data processing with large databases...big data
       
       
    • By drmike
      OVH is offline in Canada right now.
      Someone miles away from the DC cut fiber somehow.
      What is alarming here is that fiber goes to Newark, NJ, meaning it appears OVH only has that bandwidth.  No local / regional peering.  Quite strange.
      6 strands are down.  OVH CEO said 4 hours.  
      It's dark fiber, no clue how big the whole bundle they are in - might be a ton of fibers to cut, prep, polish, test, etc. before they get things patched up.