Best coding language to know in 2015?

wlanboy

Content Contributer
It is a combination of more than one language:

  • HTML5 / JS frontends
  • C# (Rest API) backends
  • MSSQL/DocumentDB/Redis Cache
AngularJS is able to create great single page apps. If you build a restfull interface for your backend you can build frontends without knowing anything about the backend. Loose coupling is the keyword to keep the dependencies as low as possible.

.Net changed alot - CLR, CIL. Common Language Runtime and Common Intermediate Language just to name two.
 

joepie91

New Member
As an aside, I'd explicitly recommend against learning PHP. It's a terrible language, the ecosystem is rife with low-quality code and poor advice, and while it seems easy to write and deploy PHP, it's actually really hard to write and deploy PHP correctly.
 

drmike

100% Tier-1 Gogent
Python remains the steady go to for many projects.

As always, learning C seems to be gateway to good things.  Those traditionally educated tend to have been forced into C programming as part of their studies.
 

vampireJ

New Member
There's nothing it's particularly good at, and several things it's outright bad at - data integrity being an important one. MongoDB has an extremely poor track record in data integrity - to the point where until fairly recently, it would quietly throw away any data it couldn't store, which would be anything above some 3GB on a 32-bits system. Emphasis on 'silently' - it wouldn't even give you an error, just pretend that the write succeeded.
It seems to be a known problem since at least 5 years back.

http://blog.mongodb.org/post/137788967/32-bit-limitations

Obviously the 32 bit OS has a file size limitation as well which mongodb is not able to workaround with.

    Other problems include it being non-relational (almost all data is actually relational), not having schemas (basically all data has schemas), hard to maintain, and performance not being very good.
It is afterall a NoSQL solution (and quite a pioneer as far as I know) and not RDBMS. Since I was used to MySQL- MongoDB is a new way to do things for me. But I quite enjoy it very soon after.

You can read about the advantages of MongoDB or NoSQL to RDBMS but for me-

1. Non integer IDs makes for basically unlimited records / documents. If you have heard about twitter before moving to a string ID. Integer ids would soon all be used up and the headache of working around it is a big problem.

2. JSON (actually BSON) support throughout.

3. Aggregation is very powerful and which relational queries can never do.

4. The supposedly no defined schema is a flexibility- and it offers actually an advantage and makes everything easy.

Only thing I have to say is not so good is that it eats up a lot of ram so not really LEB friendly. But the performance tradeof is really great.
 
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Servers4You

Member
Verified Provider
If you are looking at making sites and web development I'd recommend PHP, mainly because it is the most widely used for web apps, however a lot of PHP can be structured around other stuff such as CURL.

A proper web developer would also learn C++ and Phyton. If you are looking to build web apps, I'd also recommend you learn HTML5 and CSS and if you want to store data then I'd also recommend SQL.

The only thing that hurts my head is trying to learn JavaScript, I just can't wrap my head around it.
 

joepie91

New Member
Okay, fuck IPB - it has now eaten my reply twice, doesn't save drafts, and even breaks my form data saving extension. I'm writing this in an external editor and copying it in - that means you won't have fancy IPB quotes, but e-mail style quotes instead.

 

--

 

> @vampireJ: It seems to be a known problem since at least 5 years back.

> http://blog.mongodb....bit-limitations

> Obviously the 32 bit OS has a file size limitation as well which mongodb is not able to workaround with.

 

The 32-bit limitation is a dumb architectural limitation that's a result of their (questionable) architectural decisions, but it's not even the real problem I was trying to point out. The real problem is that it quietly throws away data. That is inexcusable for something pretending to be a database.

 

> It is afterall a NoSQL solution (and quite a pioneer as far as I know) and not RDBMS.

 

"NoSQL", "schemaless" and "non-relational" are three entirely different concepts. They can exist in the same system, but none of them implies or requires any of the others.

 

And no, MongoDB is not a "pioneer" - systems like BerkeleyDB and CouchDB have been around for much longer.

 

> 1. Non integer IDs makes for basically unlimited records / documents. If you have heard about twitter before moving to a string ID. Integer ids would soon all be used up and the headache of working around it is a big problem.

 

This is in no way related or exclusive to MongoDB or NoSQL. Every major database allows for strings as primary keys, so you can use UUIDs (exactly like MongoDB does) - PostgreSQL even has a special UUID column type for it.

 

> 2. JSON (actually BSON) support throughout.

 

As does PostgreSQL.

 

> 3. Aggregation is very powerful and which relational queries can never do.

 

Sorry, what? The majority of MongoDB's aggregration functionality is modeled directly after the various constructs that exist in SQL databases. I'd like to see something you can do in MongoDB, that you can't do in PostgreSQL.

 

> 4. The supposedly no defined schema is a flexibility- and it offers actually an advantage and makes everything easy.

 

No, it doesn't, did you even read the article I linked? There is practically always a schema, whether you want it or not. You just end up implicitly defining it in your applications, meaning you can no longer meaningfully migrate your schema, and if you have more than one isolated component accessing the database, you now need to implement your schema in multiple places.

 

And again, PostgreSQL offers JSON support. If you believe that "not having a schema" is actually a thing that is possible, then feel free to use that.

 

> But the performance tradeof is really great.

 

And I'd like to see a benchmark on that. I have been asking people to provide me with proof of this "great performance" claim for years now, and nobody has ever been able to show that MongoDB performs better than anything that isn't CouchDB. Indeed, the articles I linked - which, again, you evidently didn't read - show the exact opposite.

 

As far as I have seen, MongoDB is slow. It isn't fast. Stop claiming it is, unless you can actually back it up with hard numbers.

 

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> @Servers4You: If you are looking at making sites and web development I'd recommend PHP, mainly because it is the most widely used for web apps,

 

That is not a good reason. If you want to build sites, it's completely irrelevant what language is used the most for other people's sites.

 

> however a lot of PHP can be structured around other stuff such as CURL.

 

cURL bindings exist for practically every language, though you usually don't need them, as those languages have better libraries available. This is in no way exclusive to PHP.

 

> A proper web developer would also learn C++ and Phyton.

 

What? C++ is almost entirely irrelevant to web development. And being a "proper web developer" in no way requires Python, either. It's one language of many.

 

> The only thing that hurts my head is trying to learn JavaScript, I just can't wrap my head around it.

 

This is a good place to start.
 

Minmeo

New Member
What are good books you can recommend that discusses programming but not limited to just one language? Like something that is a introduction or basic look into it?
 
What are good books you can recommend that discusses programming but not limited to just one language? Like something that is a introduction or basic look into it?
@raindog308 mentioned above: The Art of Computer Programming. Quoting him, "After you've read all volumes of TAOCP, you'll be ready for anything."

Other good reads would be books on algorithm design, such as Introduction to Algorithms (or the more lightweight Algorithms Unlocked, both by Cormen), Algorithms, by Sedgewick, or The Algorithm Design Manual, by Skiena, for instance.

Books on data structures also make interesting reads, in general, and those you can sometimes find versions for specific languages (such as Data Structures and Algorithm Analysis in C++, by Mark Allen Weiss). You might find easier to follow/more interesting to read one of these with "real code" instead of pseudocode. Apart from that, you can find some real nice resources on sites such as Coursera and the like.
 

raindog308

vpsBoard Premium Member
Moderator
A fun talk by Bob Martin on the history of programming languages in which he mentions good books to read:


In fairness, the books he mentions are "how to really get programming and be awesome" books, not "how to write an iOS app in 30 days".  For example, "Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs" which is a beautiful book and very mind-expanding but not something that you will pick up tomorrow when you need the syntax for a python dictionary.
 

redswitches

New Member
Verified Provider
PHP is the most simplest language to learn , so is Python. Both are really great languages to start web app development. 
 

Lewis-H

Member
Best Programming Languages to Learn in 2020
Swift. ...
Scala. ...
Go. ...
Python. ...
Elm. ...
Ruby. ...
C# Like C++, C# (pronounced C Sharp) is a general-purpose, object-oriented language built on the foundations of C. ...
Rust. Rust is a bit of an upstart among the other languages on this list, but that doesn't mean it's not a valuable language to learn.
 
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