IPv6-Capable VPS in Northeast US

D. Strout

Resident IPv6 Proponent
I'm looking for a low end VPS in the northeast U.S. (or southeast Canada) with IPv6 capabilities (a must). No bigger than 256MB memory, disk space no object (2GB would do), and low bandwidth (50GB minimum). The main thing is it must have native IPv6. My budget for this VPS is up to $5/mo. Locations such as NYC, Toronto, Montreal, or possibly Buffalo are the idea.

Go at it!
 
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D. Strout

Resident IPv6 Proponent
Best I could find, 512mb ovz but it's a little over your budget.

http://www.lowendbox.com/blog/gotekky-5-95month-512mb-openvz-vps-in-toronto-canada/
A little more than I need, too, in terms of specs. Buffalo would also work of course, but IPv6 and Buffalo do not mix. I could also do NYC, or even Montreal if necessary. I'm looking for northeast US or southeast Canada, but Toronto seems to be the best bet in terms of DCs/providers with IPv6. I'm open to other offers.
 
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drmike

100% Tier-1 Gogent
There are more options when you unfocus from Montreal and Toronto markets.  Not tons though due to the disk surcharge.

Latency should be fine for you all the way from Chicago on the west boundary to the Atlantic ocean on the east boundary.  Southern boundary is more challenging.  Metro DC is about as far south to look before regional routing and long hauling show up and route to distant out of way locations.

If you must consider nearby market (doubt Buffalo is right location per se - routing too often goes out of local area backhauled to major metro and then back over).   BuyVM does IPV6 through their tunnel.

I'd compile a list of non-Buffalo providers who offer in the price point or less.  The ones that under price and under on disk, I'd ask about disk surcharge/custom plan.
 

drmike

100% Tier-1 Gogent
Wait, think I missed something,  what is the disk space requirement?

IPV6

256MB RAM

low disk amount

50GB of transit a month.
 

drmike

100% Tier-1 Gogent
@SeriesN / Ninjahawk offers out of Atlantic Metro in NYC proper.   Does coupons and discounts.

Something like this plan will probably work:

OVZ-Student - Original price, $7/mo, After discount $3/mo
 

  • 256 MB Guaranteed RAM
  • 256 MB VSWAP
  • 13GB Disk Space (Raid 10)
  • 200GB Monthly Transfer (100Mbps Shared Port)
  • 1 IPV4 Address
Check on the IPV6 availability on his NYC nodes.
 

drmike

100% Tier-1 Gogent
EdgeVM / EGI offers out of NYC too with IPV6:

OpenVZ-256 for $5/mo

  • 256MB
  • 1 CPU Core
  • 25GB RAID-10 HDD
  • 1 IPv4 Address (Up to 3 IPv6 Available Upon Request)
  • 100Mbit port
  • 1000GB Bandwidth Monthly
 

D. Strout

Resident IPv6 Proponent
Wow @, thanks for doing all this research and putting all this info together. TBH I don't know much about routing, so all this is very useful. Could you please explain further where the core networks are and which markets are backhauling to these? Also, how do I get the discount you mentioned at NinjaHawk?
 

drmike

100% Tier-1 Gogent
1. Ninjahawk - look for his ads on here in VPS section and PM him.

2. Routing isn't much to know about as an end user.  What you care about is direct routes and local/regional peering near you.

3. Core networks -  The US Northeast is heavily centered around New York as a main gateway and Washington DC.  There are smaller regional hubs in some metro areas but those are less important to you I suspect.    

Many providers run a heavy New York CIty and Chicago PoP arrangement.  Some have smaller PoP's along their network.

What you often see though that is problematic is lack of peering handoff from a provider to your internet provider.  The closest mutual peer point might go from Buffalo, NY for example (where I've seen this recently) all the way back to Chicago then all the way back over to get to New York City.  That's an extreme example since both big markets with tons of peering.  This gets far more common as you head into lower tier cities.

4. Determine best provider -  with any provider considered what I do is both ping and traceroute to there public IP in same pool/server/network as where my service would be.  I check the routes and latency to be what I consider acceptable.

In your experience, New England to any NY, NJ, PA, etc. server you should be looking at 20-30ms total trip to the server.  Possible your provider might be a small entity and nested on a bad network, single homed, etc.  That could increase the latency.   So if that's true, look for something good peering wise to your provider since you are probably the #1 user of your own VPS services.
 

drmike

100% Tier-1 Gogent
Providers out of Choopa/Constant facility in New Jersey *should* have IPV6 as the facility offers it.

GetKVM offers out of there and lists IPV6 in ads.
 

SeriesN

New Member
Verified Provider
According to DC, they should have v6 completely up in next 2 mo. Wished tunneled v6 was an option but the latency :(

Thanks for the mention though :). We have a lot of things going on behind the scene and will have some fresh things up and live soon :)
 
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D. Strout

Resident IPv6 Proponent
According to DC, they should have v6 completely up in next 2 mo. Wished tunneled v6 was an option but the latency :(
I looked up your DC's AS, and I was rather confused. They have IPv6 peers, they announce IPv6 prefixes, but there are no IPv6 prefixes originated. How on earth does that work? Also, doesn't Hurricane Electric offer tunneling in NYC? They are a peer of Atlantic Metro, so I would think it would be possible with very little additional latency.
 

SeriesN

New Member
Verified Provider
I looked up your DC's AS, and I was rather confused. They have IPv6 peers, they announce IPv6 prefixes, but there are no IPv6 prefixes originated. How on earth does that work? Also, doesn't Hurricane Electric offer tunneling in NYC? They are a peer of Atlantic Metro, so I would think it would be possible with very little additional latency.
I don't recon seeing tunnel outt of NY but will definately take a look into that.
 

D. Strout

Resident IPv6 Proponent
Nope. Still looking. I'm hoping @SeriesN's investigations in to tunneling in NYC will be successful, until his DC goes native. I'm also considering DigitalOcean in NYC, again tunneling with HE.net. Weird thing with that, though. I did a traceroute from a DO box to HE.net's NYC tunnel server IP and found that the routing goes thusly: Level3 Newark -> Cogentco NYC -> Level3 NYC -> Cogentco NYC -> Level3 NYC -> HE.net. Still minimal latency (>2ms ping), but I know NinjaHawk's upstream peers directly with HE, so that would work better anyway. I would just go ahead and grab a box from them, but I've never gotten tunneling to work on OpenVZ, even with the tb-tun thing.
 
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