Trend Projection

HalfEatenPie

The Irrational One
Retired Staff
VPS has been a pretty interesting market to look at. 

Originally we started out with the good old OpenVZ vs KVM vs Xen vs VMWare vs Docker vs Potato arguments.

Then it went from just a VPS vs Cloud.

So I'm not a betting man, but what do you think will be the newest trend?  

Additional Services (e.g. Anycast)?  Beefier (yet economical) nodes?  
 

trewq

Active Member
Verified Provider
Proper High Availability. That'll be a big one once people realise that $7 won't get them what they want.
 

HalfEatenPie

The Irrational One
Retired Staff
Proper High Availability. That'll be a big one once people realise that $7 won't get them what they want.
This VPS being down is costing me millions of dollars per minute!  Get it up as soon as possible or else my lawyers will sue you for everything you have plus your pet goldfish!  

Do you know who I am?!  I'm Johnny Fabio, a big-time small company CEO who is very important in my industry!  Me even having to talk to a low-life tech support is an insult to my name!  It's only very important for me to get this site back up as soon as possible since 100% of our business comes from the internet! 

Why isn't it up yet?!  Hurry up!

Yeah...  I want to say the end user should be responsible for proper high availability... but we all know most will still complain.  
 
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VPN.SH

Active Member
I've no idea what the "newest trend" will be, but it's certainly interesting watching the progressions. I do like the idea of hourly billing, however as far as I know, there isn't any provider offering hourly billing in the form of being able to turn off a container, whilst rebooting it on exactly the same IP with practically no changes - whilst not having to pay whilst in it's "off" form?

That's an area that I'm particularly interested in watching, as for some tasks it's more efficient to just have a container online at certain times, however it can sometimes be more of a pain to restore everything from scratch rather than just turning on the old container again.
 

DomainBop

Dormant VPSB Pathogen
Originally we started out with the good old OpenVZ vs KVM vs Xen vs VMWare vs Docker vs Potato arguments.

Then it went from just a VPS vs Cloud.
Obviously a youngster, I thought we started the virtualized server hosting discussion with RoseHosting, Linux vServer, and Pentium III's 14 years ago. :p

but what do you think will be the newest trend?
Using SolusVM, which has failed to keep up with changing demands, will become a liability and a good way to drive potential customers to your competitors. :)
 

HalfEatenPie

The Irrational One
Retired Staff
Obviously a youngster, I thought we started the virtualized server hosting discussion with RoseHosting, Linux vServer, and Pentium III's 14 years ago. :p

Using SolusVM, which has failed to keep up with changing demands, will become a liability and a good way to drive potential customers to your competitors. :)
Haha.  Well I was simply referencing the more recent trends since going back further wouldn't solve anything.  

Honestly, I think just getting a VPS Control Panel that seamlessly integrates with billing would be a great start/end to that.  
 

drmike

100% Tier-1 Gogent
Next trends:

1. Privacy - this is way bigger issue and concern than anyone probably realizes.   From provider side, tons needs to be done to be sane and communicate where you stand on various things under your control or that could cause you to be impacted.

From consumer side [biz and actual normal peasant folks] this is about insurance against ID theft.  About isolating themselves from their viewing habits online.  I call it life insurance, if you want to have a life in the near future.

2. Self Hosting -  Refer to #1.  More folks are going to boomerang back to old steady process of self hosting in house, in home, etc.  But now with abundant lower power devices that are server capable and proliferation of wireless signals, the place a server can and will be is limitless - at least below flight cruising altitude.

3. Localism - more people are going to see the wisdom, depending on country or state to host things in official datacenters, but on a local basis.   In the same state notably.  Perhaps in some limited hamlets out there where certain strategic advantages.  

4. Fractured centralization - sooooo much of what is the web today has been consolidated into a few wayyyy too big companies.  These storage silos of public trust have proven to be insecure, subject to government whims, even outright tapped.   People will continue to move away from these entities and toward other upstarts and alternatives.  Big opportunity for new companies to develop strong offerings that do one thing well and that's it.  The Walmart is Google is everything portal of doom model 2.x is nearing end of fashion.

5.  New mobile OS / player.  Ideally someone that gets they should not be Android, but able to run Android and ideally said player means run Android anywhere - any device, any browser, etc.  That's how the the giant sloth Google gets slayed in a big way.  Especially where such OS /  player afford granular controls, ways to block out annoying asshole embedded shitware features.  I swear Android / Google must have kickback schema with cell cos to consumer asshole amounts of bandwidth and run up folks bills.  They probably make more on said racket than any other aspect of Assdroid.

In strict tech-bation  form, I see more and more interest going into Docker and similar container isolation competitors.   Very abstract like Cloud, like distributed, etc.   It's nerd food at best until someone bundles and packages things that are simple to click and deploy.   Then it will encroach / shuffle the VPS / Cloud market share a bit.

Anycast is hot around here, but more nerd fiddling.  Talking about need for redundancy and high availability.   These aren't ingredients for mom's cat picture website.  They are more nerd solutions and aspiring businesses and strange use cases.  There is a market there alright, not denying that. 

[PS: all typos are mine.. I've earned them... busy busy]
 
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splitice

Just a little bit crazy...
Verified Provider
Layer 7 DDoS attacks will become more popular as Layer 4 DDoS protection becomes more popular and prevalent.

I will also predict:

- A new massively popular vulnrability will be found to be insecure and usable for massive amplification attacks. There is just too much software, both legacy and new developed without these considerations being priority.

- IPv6 adoption wont increase significantly in 2015
 

splitice

Just a little bit crazy...
Verified Provider
I predict 2018-2020 as the IPv6 year, perhaps by then dual stack sites will be normal.

I also have confidence that VPSB will be around in 3-5 years to verify this claim.
 

wlanboy

Content Contributer
Next trends:

1. Privacy

2. Self Hosting -  Refer to #1. 

3. Localism
Interesting points.

So #1 will be quite far away. People still using Office365, Apple Services, Google Apps.


And they won't use any secure and privacy protecting services if they are not stupid simple to use.

#2 will be a bummer.


More and more small devices will become on the wave of IoT.

I don't like the Internet of Things trend - but at least all little devices will have WIFI and Bluetooth.

Arduino YUN running OpenWRT and Intel Galileo 2 are just the starters.

#3 was a hit in 2014 and will be a hit in 2015.

Companies want local datacenters and want local private clouds.

Not just for visiting but for legal concerns.

They want and need local regulations and a commitment to fullfill legal standards (speaking for EU customers).

Layer 7 DDoS attacks will become more popular as Layer 4 DDoS protection becomes more popular and prevalent.


I will also predict:


- A new massively popular vulnrability will be found to be insecure and usable for massive amplification attacks. There is just too much software, both legacy and new developed without these considerations being priority.


- IPv6 adoption wont increase significantly in 2015
Yup, plug-able protection to tunnel traffic through a service to secure servers will be more interesting.

And you might be true that IPv6 will still be not a feature but a hassle to vps customers...
 

bigcat

Member
Verified Provider
Year of Linux desktop?  :rolleyes: lol

1) more serious provider will come up with floating IP & detachable storage.

2) In general service market, storage will become more dispensable with S3/Ceph/Swift. I'm talking about hosting-service-in-disguise such as Dropbox, Flickr etc

At certain point those service will no longer care about storage size.
 
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