Do you wear computer glasses? Share your experience

Ruchirablog

New Member
Hello,

Like most of you I'm on the computer for more than 8 hours a day since past 5 years. My vision was perfect few years ago even when I was sitting in front of the computer for long periods of time. But now when I'm on the computer I feel the strain on my eyes and sometimes I get this blurred vision. 

And I feel like my regular vision is decreased a bit. I don't know if its just my mind or not. Im really looking to relieve this strain and get computer glasses. 

Do you guys wear computer glasses? whats the effectiveness of those? Do I need to visit a optician to get my eyes checked in order to get computer glasses or is it okay to buy an quality one from ebay?

Your opinions are much appreciated. 

Thanks

PS: I have set my brightness and contrast level to 0 but I still feel like its too much. And I dont get headaches. Its just strain and blurred vision 
 
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Damian

New Member
Verified Provider
Is your computer's window resolution set to the appropriate value for the monitor? I specifically use a monitor with best resolution 1944x1280 despite 2580x1600 resolution being "the best" now because 1944x1280 hurts my eyes less.

This comes from someone who wears glasses as a requirement of being able to see in general, and with severe astigmatism on one eye. If I rotate my glasses on a fixed point, everything becomes a parallelogram.
 

drmike

100% Tier-1 Gogent
Eons ago I maintained everyones desk setups from furniture to specialized pieces in a 50+ person company.  We believed in ergonomics and healthy employees.

I'd eliminate self inflicted physical injuries before going to glasses and potentially misadjusting your eyes.

Like most desk injuries, the problems typically are reduced blood flow.   

I'd adjust the height and distance of your computer from your seat.  Typically, a full single arm distance should be proximate to monitor placement.  It should be as high or higher than you eyes when seated.

I'd also adjust room light level and remove any background brightness.  Some folks who work in dark rooms may need at add light.

Finally, exercise.   Get up every hour at least for 20 minutes.  Stretch and get moving.

Stretching and head rotations can be done while working too.  Don't forget to exercise your eyes often... Rotate them circular fashion and left right repetitions.

The neck is a very prone to issue area for programmers and those stuck to their monitor.   Visiting a chiropractor and/or a message therapist is also recommended prior to changing anything or buying glasses.   We use to employee a masseuse one day a week for free company massages for those that needed them. 
 

Ruchirablog

New Member
Is your computer's window resolution set to the appropriate value for the monitor? I specifically use a monitor with best resolution 1944x1280 despite 2580x1600 resolution being "the best" now because 1944x1280 hurts my eyes less.
Well I use a small 17inch LCD monitor though :( 1280*1024 is the resolution. And I'm using this for past 5 years. These eye troubles started since about an year and half. 

I only feel the strain after few hours of using the computer though. My room is bit dark even on the daytime so I have lights on most of the time. I have tried both warm and cool white cfls. Cool white is bit relieving though 
 

Ruchirablog

New Member
Eons ago I maintained everyones desk setups from furniture to specialized pieces in a 50+ person company.  We believed in ergonomics and healthy employees.

I'd eliminate self inflicted physical injuries before going to glasses and potentially misadjusting your eyes.

Like most desk injuries, the problems typically are reduced blood flow.   

I'd adjust the height and distance of your computer from your seat.  Typically, a full single arm distance should be proximate to monitor placement.  It should be as high or higher than you eyes when seated.

I'd also adjust room light level and remove any background brightness.  Some folks who work in dark rooms may need at add light.

Finally, exercise.   Get up every hour at least for 20 minutes.  Stretch and get moving.

Stretching and head rotations can be done while working too.  Don't forget to exercise your eyes often... Rotate them circular fashion and left right repetitions.

The neck is a very prone to issue area for programmers and those stuck to their monitor.   Visiting a chiropractor and/or a message therapist is also recommended prior to changing anything or buying glasses.   We use to employee a masseuse one day a week for free company massages for those that needed them. 
Thanks for all your suggestions :)  Here is my desk and chair 

C89ZNh.jpg

my PC wasn't at the desk when I took the photo though. I have already adjusted the height according to your guidelines. Remembering to exercise is the hardest part. :) I might exercise today but might forget to do that tomorrow. :( I think I should get a timer or some app to remember me the time to exercise until I get used to the schedule.

What color temperature do you think that will work best? Most suggestions on the internet were to use cool white which is what I use right now. But most offices and other work places seems to prefer warm light which is what I used for about a year (as seen on the pic above) 
 
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Damian

New Member
Verified Provider
Well I use a small 17inch LCD monitor though :( 1280*1024 is the resolution. And I'm using this for past 5 years. These eye troubles started since about an year and half. 

I only feel the strain after few hours of using the computer though. My room is bit dark even on the daytime so I have lights on most of the time. I have tried both warm and cool white cfls. Cool white is bit relieving though 
If your room is dark, you might want to try a bias light: 

bias1-4e558ed-intro.jpg

A bit of an exaggerated picture, but visualizes the idea. There's kits on Amazon for <$20.
 
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rds100

New Member
Verified Provider
You don't need glasses. You just need to blink.

When you work at the computer and stare at the monitor you forget blinking. As a result, your eyes get dry. Blinking is the natural way to wet your eyes. So you just have to learn to blink and your eyes will thank you for this.
 

drmike

100% Tier-1 Gogent
Thanks for all your suggestions :)  Here is my desk and chair 

C89ZNh.jpg
Here's what I'll note:

1. Window placement relative to things is problematic, unless you keep that window closed and covered at most times.  Might still be letting light in and contributing to eye fatigue.  I'd consider rotating the desk so computer is not backlit by the window and I'd try utilizing outdoor light during the day when glare isn't severe (depends day to day and on shade factor on that side of the building).

2. The computer placed on the desk like you have the notebook, is very bad for posture.   I see this all the time.  On the cheap, raise the computer up with a box, or 4 legged wood surface made out of cheap but solid lumber.  They do make monitor stands and that may or may not be cheapest and easiest option -- but the stands often are not adequate height and are non adjustable.

3. The chair you have is all wrong for being productive and spending day at the desk doing technical work.   That chair is what I call a management chair.  It is for paper shufflers and people who spend much of their time kicked back talking on the phone.  Even if it has adjustments, the posture is essentially an L with the seat facing upwards.  Productive proper chairs will have the L being seat parallel to the floor or optimally (depends on person) the seat tilted down towards the floor.

The seat you need should include multiple adjustments for height, pitch, back, etc.

Also, you MUST have a chair that has adjustable armrests.  Again the more adjustability the better.  The arm rests should be padded and comfortable when you are pressing forearm and elbow into them.   If you use what you have carpel tunnel is almost certainly in your future.

Doing all that should have you sitting upright mostly with the seatback firmly supporting you there.  Arms on rests with minimal arm and wrist on desk surface.   Monitor at eye level or higher depending on you.   Knees should be comfortably bent much like sitting in a chair when dining (not pub style either with knees bent backwards).

I hope that helps some.

Adjusting monitor contrast, color and resolution as others have recommended should be done after modifying the physical environment.

If you perfect all of this, probably a few weeks to several months for your body to adjust.  Keep notes as you go of pain, discomfort, changes you made, etc.
 
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5n1p

New Member
Have to agree on all @buffalooed said. I had glasses with minimum correction factor +0,25, but after some time of wearing them my head started to heart alot, and I'm sitting on pc for 8 to 12 hours a day in last 10 or more years, after I adjusted my seat and raised monitor with using proper chair I have stoped using glasses. 

Only thing to add to everything posted here: drink lot's of water, and try to watch in far distance for atleast minute or two in every hour, for this you would actually need to go to window or balcony and take a view from there.
 

Ruchirablog

New Member
Here's what I'll note:

1. Window placement relative to things is problematic, unless you keep that window closed and covered at most times.  Might still be letting light in and contributing to eye fatigue.  I'd consider rotating the desk so computer is not backlit by the window and I'd try utilizing outdoor light during the day when glare isn't severe (depends day to day and on shade factor on that side of the building).

2. The computer placed on the desk like you have the notebook, is very bad for posture.   I see this all the time.  On the cheap, raise the computer up with a box, or 4 legged wood surface made out of cheap but solid lumber.  They do make monitor stands and that may or may not be cheapest and easiest option -- but the stands often are not adequate height and are non adjustable.

3. The chair you have is all wrong for being productive and spending day at the desk doing technical work.   That chair is what I call a management chair.  It is for paper shufflers and people who spend much of their time kicked back talking on the phone.  Even if it has adjustments, the posture is essentially an L with the seat facing upwards.  Productive proper chairs will have the L being seat parallel to the floor or optimally (depends on person) the seat tilted down towards the floor.

The seat you need should include multiple adjustments for height, pitch, back, etc.

Also, you MUST have a chair that has adjustable armrests.  Again the more adjustability the better.  The arm rests should be padded and comfortable when you are pressing forearm and elbow into them.   If you use what you have carpel tunnel is almost certainly in your future.

Doing all that should have you sitting upright mostly with the seatback firmly supporting you there.  Arms on rests with minimal arm and wrist on desk surface.   Monitor at eye level or higher depending on you.   Knees should be comfortably bent much like sitting in a chair when dining (not pub style either with knees bent backwards).

I hope that helps some.

Adjusting monitor contrast, color and resolution as others have recommended should be done after modifying the physical environment.

If you perfect all of this, probably a few weeks to several months for your body to adjust.  Keep notes as you go of pain, discomfort, changes you made, etc.
Yeah I agree that Window placement is wrong and I keep the blinds closed all the time because sun light comes right off there hitting my eyes. Moving the desk is hard because of the other furniture placements :( And like I said this pic was taken few months back without my PC on it. I do have placed my monitor like you said.

I totally agree about your advice's about the chair. Arm rests aren't padded on this and its a major trouble for me. Previously I have used a cheapo plastic chair and it didn't had padded arm rests too but it never gave me trouble. So when I purchased this I didn't took much attention to arm rests :( And this chair has height adjustment. I guess I need a new chair then. There goes my $150~ :S
 

drmike

100% Tier-1 Gogent
 I have used a cheapo plastic chair and it didn't had padded arm rests too but it never gave me trouble. So when I purchased this I didn't took much attention to arm rests And this chair has height adjustment. I guess I need a new chair then. There goes my $150~ :S
Just sprung for a $160+ chair like I described from local office chain.  It is subpar in my opinion.  Better than a nearly identical chair to yours that was being used, but the chair lacks any head rest. (chair wasn't for me and person was on a budget and needed it now).  If you read lots, then a chair with adjustable head/neck rest is probably better.  They aren't cheap.

If you made do with a folding or other non adjustable chair, I'd revert to using it.  Benefit is the lack of arm rests isn't going to reduce blood flow to wrist and hands.  Carpal syndrome can be attributed to people pushing on their elbow to wrist for hours a day. You are less likely to have your arms up and pressing on them with an armless chair.  Simply true because desks aren't deep enough to facilitate :)

Recommend visiting your local office equipment store and trying the chairs out.  Simulate usage before buying and fidget with the chair.  Heck, I'd even pack up the stand and portable and take it there and setup desk and do some work.  Test driving furniture like this is mandatory.  

One other thing you may not be aware of is chairs actually do come in different sizes.  If manufacturer makes one size chairs for this sort of use, don't buy from them.

I remain a big fan of Herman Miller and the Aeron Chairs.  They are expensive, but injuries are far more expensive.

8 hours a day     x   50 weeks   x    5 days per week = 2000 hours a year stuffed in your chair.

Think about it, what else do you spend 2000 hours using per year?   It's not exactly the place to skimp or argue about cost.

Good chairs should last your many years even with such heavy use.   Real manufacturers like Miller have serviceable chairs and you are able to replace torn backing, flattened padding on the seat and damage coasters and adjustments.
 

MartinD

Retired Staff
Verified Provider
Retired Staff
Sitting on a HM Aeron at the moment. Very expensive, yes, but then it's worth it for your health. They're also entirely recycled too so you're doing your bit for the environment :)
 

Boltersdriveer

Member
Verified Provider
It's pretty weird, apart from having been staring at the screen or doing desk work pretty much for >75% of the time for the past few years and yet my eyesight has been near perfect still. 
 

drmike

100% Tier-1 Gogent
It's pretty weird, apart from having been staring at the screen or doing desk work pretty much for >75% of the time for the past few years and yet my eyesight has been near perfect still. 
I've been an 8 hour+ a day desk dweller for nearing 30 years.

It wasn't until a few years ago where these best practices truly mattered.  Meaning, a few years back I started noticing changes, annoyances, etc. with physical body.  Sure, effects of accumulated years is a part of it.  Can't be self abusive like in the years of my youth.

I have great 20/20 or better vision, but it is a chore now to not damage my vision.  Probably change my desk/work area in a big way at least quarterly.  That's in part why I have three major work areas and migrate between then almost seasonally.  Each area has existing desk, wiring, accessories, etc.  Reshuffling them and moving my current workstation is basically the major extent of the move.

Come fall I'll migrate from the subterranean office with natural light (big window off to right side) to my library which has no windows and little natural light.   

Trying to perfect "thin stations" or at least long cables to leave workstation in central location.  Helps reduce noise stress (which I haven't yet spoke about) and effects from electro-magnetics.
 

pcan

New Member
Sitting on a HM Aeron at the moment. Very expensive, yes, but then it's worth it for your health.
I am searching for a new chair since the beginning of the year and the Aeron is the recurring suggestion. I plan to buy this chair on a internet shop that is now offering a 25% rebate on the standard price. The Hermann Miller product configurator lists 3 sizes (small, medium and large). I am 170 cm tall and my weight is 66 Kg, basically right in the middle of my country statistics, so I was about to order the medium size. On a second thought, Herman Miller is a USA company. According to direct evidence, standard USA people size seems to be a little bigger than here (and increasing :), so maybe the small size is the right one. I cannot test directly, because shops in my area only have Aeron imitations, no one has the real thing on display. Which size do you suggest, according to your experience? The size is encoded on the number of marks in the upper part of the back (1 mark = small, 2 = medium, 3 = large).

For people that understands german, french or italian, a beautiful computer ergonomics guide is on the Swiss National Accident Insurance Fund web site, www.suva.ch/online-lernen . Clic the french / italian button for the corresponding translation (if needed) and then select the computer ergonomics guide; english translation is not available.
 

MannDude

Just a dude
vpsBoard Founder
Moderator
Sitting on a HM Aeron at the moment. Very expensive, yes, but then it's worth it for your health. They're also entirely recycled too so you're doing your bit for the environment :)
My cat would love scratching that up. She claws the back of my chair now, and slowly climbs up it like a rock climber until she pulls her self up to the top and she chills there.

Cheap, crappy, Goodwill chair. It's horrible.
 

drmike

100% Tier-1 Gogent
Most of the good chairs are these woven wimpy fabrics @MannDude.  That's why chairs like the OP posted are globally so popular.  Leather or fake leather = easy cleaning and higher durability.

I don't allow animals in my home or office.  Needless to say, they'd destroy an Aeron chair and tear/snag the material in a week.  Best to stick to the leather type stuff for you.
 
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