amuck-landowner

How do you track your own VPS collection

vanarp

Active Member
Within a year of getting into VPS, I already have four of them. I am sure many here must be owning much higher number of VPSes and could have found an easier way to keep a track of them all.

So what is your method of tracking VPSes? Is there a tool like dAgent or a cool Spreadsheet template or something else?
 

Chronic

New Member
I just made a simple spreadsheet using Google Docs and fill that up with the basic information every time I make a new order. I'm sure there are better ways to do it, but so far it's worked just fine for a small number of VPSs.
 
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SeriesN

Active Member
Verified Provider
After my other days discussion. I was able to hack a nice little system with PHP+SQL+BOOTSTRAP datagrid.
 

A Jump From Let

New Member
I track bills and uptime through my email, but it's not that good, I'd prefer using any sort of management system to handle related information.
 

HostUS-Alexander

Active Member
Verified Provider
I need to get a better way :X

ScreenShot-02-00632.png
 
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vanarp

Active Member
You can always use this: https://github.com/mojeda/ServerStatus       
Make it look like this: http://uptime.munroenet.com/
 
Thanks for mention of this monitoring tool. Will need to setup. However what I asked for is an inventory tracking method for VPSes.

Ours has been customized a bit more but this is the basic. You will get the idea. http://exacttarget.g...uelux/#datagrid
 
Looks interesting. Not being a programmer myself, would love any ready made tools.

KeyPass and mRemoteNG are nice options.
 
mRemoteNG looks awesome. Much better than Putty Connection Manager.

I track bills and uptime through my email, but it's not that good, I'd prefer using any sort of management system to handle related information.
 
Exactly! I hope there is something like what @dAgent coded for domains.

I need to get a better way :X
 
As mentioned by @Chronic I made a little Google Docs spreadsheet and bookmarked it for now.
 

willie

Active Member
I just have a nickname for each one, with an /etc/hosts entry for each nickname.  The exception is lowendspirit since I don't have ipv6 at home at the moment, so I have shell aliases to ssh to the NATted ssh ports.  For various reasons I decided not to point any DNS at most of them.  Maybe DNS would simplify things.
 

drmike

100% Tier-1 Gogent
Some interesting stuff on this thread.  

Like the BlueVM script and modifications.  Will have to get that up and tested some time soon.

For tracking my accounts I keep a paper copy (just in case).

Main details electronically, I put in an "advanced" notepad app - KeepNote.
 

walesmd

New Member
I just use a Google Docs spreadsheet for the technical documentation (IP Address, hostname, initial root password, etc), the easily normalized data points, as well as a Google Dos document for what I call "Administrative documentation" which includes the data points that are not so easily normalized (various account details with the providers, provisioning instructions, etc).

I have been playing with Google Apps Script a lot lately; I'll see what I can do to get my stuff cleaned up, more usable, and available for the public's use as a template/Chrome Store app.
 

acd

New Member
I just have a nickname for each one, with an /etc/hosts entry for each nickname.[...]
My login box has a file in ~/.ssh/config with contents like so:


Host blxt
    HostName 192.x.x.249
    Port 9450
    User acd

Host projweb
    HostName 70.x.x.231
    Port 2552
    User tw
then I can ssh blxt or ssh projweb and it goes to the right user-at-host-and-port. This might help keep from cluttering up your bash aliases.
 
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