How do you track your own VPS collection

vanarp

Active Member
Within a year of getting into VPS, I already have four of them. I am sure many here must be owning much higher number of VPSes and could have found an easier way to keep a track of them all.

So what is your method of tracking VPSes? Is there a tool like dAgent or a cool Spreadsheet template or something else?
 

Chronic

New Member
I just made a simple spreadsheet using Google Docs and fill that up with the basic information every time I make a new order. I'm sure there are better ways to do it, but so far it's worked just fine for a small number of VPSs.
 
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SeriesN

Active Member
Verified Provider
After my other days discussion. I was able to hack a nice little system with PHP+SQL+BOOTSTRAP datagrid.
 

A Jump From Let

New Member
I track bills and uptime through my email, but it's not that good, I'd prefer using any sort of management system to handle related information.
 

vanarp

Active Member
You can always use this: https://github.com/mojeda/ServerStatus       
Make it look like this: http://uptime.munroenet.com/
 
Thanks for mention of this monitoring tool. Will need to setup. However what I asked for is an inventory tracking method for VPSes.

Ours has been customized a bit more but this is the basic. You will get the idea. http://exacttarget.g...uelux/#datagrid
 
Looks interesting. Not being a programmer myself, would love any ready made tools.

KeyPass and mRemoteNG are nice options.
 
mRemoteNG looks awesome. Much better than Putty Connection Manager.

I track bills and uptime through my email, but it's not that good, I'd prefer using any sort of management system to handle related information.
 
Exactly! I hope there is something like what @dAgent coded for domains.

I need to get a better way :X
 
As mentioned by @Chronic I made a little Google Docs spreadsheet and bookmarked it for now.
 

willie

Active Member
I just have a nickname for each one, with an /etc/hosts entry for each nickname.  The exception is lowendspirit since I don't have ipv6 at home at the moment, so I have shell aliases to ssh to the NATted ssh ports.  For various reasons I decided not to point any DNS at most of them.  Maybe DNS would simplify things.
 

drmike

100% Tier-1 Gogent
Some interesting stuff on this thread.  

Like the BlueVM script and modifications.  Will have to get that up and tested some time soon.

For tracking my accounts I keep a paper copy (just in case).

Main details electronically, I put in an "advanced" notepad app - KeepNote.
 

walesmd

New Member
I just use a Google Docs spreadsheet for the technical documentation (IP Address, hostname, initial root password, etc), the easily normalized data points, as well as a Google Dos document for what I call "Administrative documentation" which includes the data points that are not so easily normalized (various account details with the providers, provisioning instructions, etc).

I have been playing with Google Apps Script a lot lately; I'll see what I can do to get my stuff cleaned up, more usable, and available for the public's use as a template/Chrome Store app.
 

acd

New Member
I just have a nickname for each one, with an /etc/hosts entry for each nickname.[...]
My login box has a file in ~/.ssh/config with contents like so:


Host blxt
    HostName 192.x.x.249
    Port 9450
    User acd

Host projweb
    HostName 70.x.x.231
    Port 2552
    User tw
then I can ssh blxt or ssh projweb and it goes to the right user-at-host-and-port. This might help keep from cluttering up your bash aliases.
 
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