New ICANN rules will require email/phone verification for domain registration

wdq

Quade
I just saw this article on The Verge and thought I'd share it as it's relavent to this community.

Essentially it looks like it could be a whole lot harder to fake WHOIS information in the near future. When registering domains you'll need to have your phone number and email address verified within fifteen days of the registration. The registeras will also have to keep information like your payment information for a couple of years even if you cancel your domain. 

So be prepared to either turn on WHOIS protection, or use a phone number/email you don't mind being public. 

What are your thoughts?


inShare




Domain registrars like GoDaddy will soon be held far more accountable for information on those who are signing up for web domains. In the future, users will need to verify both their email address and phone number within 15 days of applying for a domain. Without verification, registrars are instructed to suspend domain registrations. The new rule, which is one among many, comes as part of a new Registrar Accreditation Agreement (RAA) approved earlier this week by the board of directors of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN) — a nonprofit which oversees everything from top-level domains to IP addresses. The updated rules, which won't take effect until a later date when registrars sign the new agreement, should make the often-inaccurate WHOIS data on domain registrations a bit more reliable, while deterring those looking to set up websites for illicit purposes from doing so.

The new agreement doesn't just require verification of registrant data, however. Registrars will be required to maintain information on those who signed up for domains, including details like credit cards, for two years after users cancel their registrations. Other information like the IP address used to sign up for a registration needs to be recorded and given to ICANN at its request for up to 180 days. Registrants will also need to update their contact information within seven days of any change under the new rules, though it's unclear how that will be enforced — the old rules only provided for 15 days to update such details and data was often outdated.  

Source: The Verge
 
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SeriesN

Active Member
Verified Provider
I don't know for you but faking email and phone no. is easy. All it takes is a gmail and google voice and both of em are free ;)

Now, postal address verification would be something .
 
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Francisco

Company Lube
Verified Provider
I don't know for you but faking email and phone no. is easy. All it takes is a gmail and google voice and both of em are free ;)

Now, postal address verification would be something .
I'm sure they'll be given a database listing the banks of phone numbers that are used by VOIP providers :p

Francisco
 

MannDude

Just a dude
vpsBoard Founder
Moderator
Not a bad idea. NameCheap WhoIS protection is free for the first year and (cheap) after that. Don't recall the exact price.

Public WhoIS I use a Google Voice number anyway and an old mailing address. If mail were to go to there it gets forwarded to my new address anyway. (or should). With the immaturity of some in this and other communities I don't wish for addresses to be public, but will likely just register a cheap PO Box then if that's the case.
 

Marc M.

Phoenix VPS
Verified Provider
Not a bad idea. NameCheap WhoIS protection is free for the first year and (cheap) after that. Don't recall the exact price.
@MannDude if you register with Name.com just use promo code "privacyplease" and you get free privacy for the first year as well. Might work for renewals, not 100% sure about that. Just thought that this info might be useful to someone... ;)
 

D. Strout

Resident IPv6 Proponent
I already use accurate info. Somewhat of a bother, I assume (hope) it will only be a one time thing per each e-mail/phone number that's used. I doubt it will help much, and honestly I don't understand why there has to be a publicly accessible database of who owns every domain.
 

maounique

Active Member
Not all TLDs are handled by ICANN, so there will still be free ones (even more as the number grows).

If it comes to that, a sim you can purchase at a machine will do.

Payment info, well, there are way around that, at least working against providers, for the government is harder every day, but, eventually, you will be able to use free subdomains, even free TLDs, or buy from other countries with paysafe or other means.
 

vanarp

Active Member
if you register with Name.com just use promo code "privacyplease" and you get free privacy for the first year as well. Might work for renewals, not 100% sure about that
 
It works for renewals too as I use this feature :)
 

drmike

100% Tier-1 Gogent
Throwaway mobile phone sim, no registration or activation needed. $1.50.
 

Gary, care to explain the mobile sim throwaways and how they come in handy for this.  I've never dealt with them before.  Seems like something I should be better aware of.  
 

drmike

100% Tier-1 Gogent
As far as the new requirements, ICANN should rename itself to ICANT.

I see no reason to have this info. The registry already has something about you for billing purposes and payment (now to avoid that leaking any info too).

What is their intention with this?

All I see are increasing domain prices and decreasing interest/demand.   I'll be looking more at non ICANN TLDs.
 

rds100

New Member
Verified Provider
Relax, soon we will all need an ICP-equivalent license to be allowed to have a website.
 

maounique

Active Member
Gary, care to explain the mobile sim throwaways and how they come in handy for this.  I've never dealt with them before.  Seems like something I should be better aware of.  
I can buy them at corner machines along with paysafe cards, recharging cards for sims, etc. They last for 12 months to be called with 4 Eur iirc. So when i need to be called to be "checked" by big brother, i can put it in a phone while being out in town and let them call me.

The phone can then rest till the next phone verification. Battery out and all.
 

rds100

New Member
Verified Provider
@Mao stranges that you still have these. Here even prepaid SIM cards have to be registered with an ID card, etc. Not anonymous any more.
 

A Jump From Let

New Member
Time to start a solid back end for people who likes privacy. 

Shall have multiple alternatives for everything, we shall work in that direction, to avoid abuse made by ICANN and such organizations.
 

Gary

Member
Gary, care to explain the mobile sim throwaways and how they come in handy for this.  I've never dealt with them before.  Seems like something I should be better aware of.  
I'm in the UK, so I can't speak for everywhere but here you can buy prepaid sims (with no calling credit loaded onto them yet) for £1 or even £0.50 sometimes.

Get one of those and put it into your phone and you're set to receive calls and SMS messages. That should allow you to do any phone verification stuff.

In fact, without paying there's: http://www.textnow.com/ and a few other similar sites that let you receive messages to a virtual phone number. Those would be easier for ICANN to blacklist though. Legitimate numbers are probably a better idea.
 
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