Best password manager? What are you using?

MannDude

Just a dude
vpsBoard Founder
Moderator
What do you think the best password manager is? I know a lot of people use LastPass, while convenient it's still worries me a tad that it's all web-based. Are there any non-web based password managers that work with browsers to automatically insert and generate strong passwords?

What do you use, and why?
 

KuJoe

Well-Known Member
Verified Provider
KeePass is my favorite and I can use it on my PC and my phone. I like the auto-type feature for entering username + password in any window or you can double click on the password field and it will stay in your clipboard for X seconds or until you paste 1 time.

The 2.x version has a lot of nice features like keylogger avoidance (will type your username and password in weird configurations) but it's not compatible with Android to my knowledge so I'm using 1.x still (both get updated and patched).
 

mikho

Not to be taken seriously, ever!
Keepass is what I use, save it to dropbox and sync it with phones, tablet, computers.


Always with me and versioned via dropbox.
 

vanarp

Active Member
I have been using LastPass for a while and in love with it. Recently started using KeePassX (little different from KeePass) too. For now keeping both of them in sync as I might discontinue to use LastPass some day on security grounds.
 

SeriesN

Active Member
Verified Provider
Notepad, synched with googledrive and my gmail requires double auth. Now if I lose my phone........
 

threz

New Member
My wife's head.  She doesn't forget dates of birthdays and anniversaries.  And so does in remembering passwords
I'm in awe. I've got ~45 passwords in my password manager... how does she remember that many unique passwords? 

I use Dashlane and received their sync-for-life benefit that they rolled out with version 2.0 for those who were around during their beta.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

D. Strout

Resident IPv6 Proponent
I used to use KeePass, and if 2.0's Linux support actually existed beyond Wine and Mono, I would still use it. It has all the features I want, and I've actually talked over e-mail with the guy who writes it, Dominic, and he's very nice. Now I use LastPass instead, but I really don't like it much, especially the Chrome extension. Chrome extensions can't create separate windows for dialogs like adding a site or generating passwords, so LP for Chrome does it hack-ishly by using new tabs, and for the prompt for filling in a password on sites it recognizes, it creates an element in the HTML that is stuck to the top of the page. This element is often interfered with by the CSS on the page, does a poor job of staying at the top, and sometimes refuses to close when you click the X button. Furthermore, LP puts a little icon in the textboxes/password boxes it fills, interfering with the CSS that was applied to them. All around, it's very ugly, and I really wish there were a better solution with true cross platform support, and which leaves me in complete control of the password file. But there isn't, so I have to use LastPass.
 

threz

New Member
I used to use KeePass, and if 2.0's Linux support actually existed beyond Wine and Mono, I would still use it. It has all the features I want, and I've actually talked over e-mail with the guy who writes it, Dominic, and he's very nice. Now I use LastPass instead, but I really don't like it much, especially the Chrome extension. Chrome extensions can't create separate windows for dialogs like adding a site or generating passwords, so LP for Chrome does it hack-ishly by using new tabs, and for the prompt for filling in a password on sites it recognizes, it creates an element in the HTML that is stuck to the top of the page. This element is often interfered with by the CSS on the page, does a poor job of staying at the top, and sometimes refuses to close when you click the X button. Furthermore, LP puts a little icon in the textboxes/password boxes it fills, interfering with the CSS that was applied to them. All around, it's very ugly, and I really wish there were a better solution with true cross platform support, and which leaves me in complete control of the password file. But there isn't, so I have to use LastPass.
Dashlane uses a similar model as LastPass, except it doesn't completely reside in the browser. There is a separate Windows of OSX application that pops up if the browser plugin wants to interact with it. You can disable the logo showing up in form fields, though it still does pop up a window asking if you want to generate a password or save credentials and such. 

It's not perfect, but I found it nicer than LastPass. They seem to be updating things on a fairly regular schedule too.
 

D. Strout

Resident IPv6 Proponent
Dashlane uses a similar model as LastPass, except it doesn't completely reside in the browser. There is a separate Windows of OSX application that pops up if the browser plugin wants to interact with it. You can disable the logo showing up in form fields, though it still does pop up a window asking if you want to generate a password or save credentials and such. 

It's not perfect, but I found it nicer than LastPass. They seem to be updating things on a fairly regular schedule too.
Without using it, Dashlane seems nice, but there is no Linux support and I've seen complaints about high memory usage. A no-go, unfortunately.
 
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