Do you currently use IPv6 actively at home or in the data center?

drmike

100% Tier-1 Gogent
I know we have a bunch of diverse users here.  This is just an informal census of IPv6.


Do you currently use IPv6 actively at home or in the data center?


Feel free to vote and add your comments about IPv6, why you use it, why you don't, etc.
 

willie

Active Member
Yes, I have several LES vps and generally connect to them by v6.  The shared ipv4 addresses have a habit of getting ddos'd.


I mostly don't feel like I need v4 for my own servers except for one running a small web site.  The rest are personal and backend services of various sorts and v6 would be fine for those.  Scaleway.com has a problem right now because they're short of v4 addresses so it's hard to spin up new servers.  v6 would mostly solve that but they don't have it yet.
 
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drmike

100% Tier-1 Gogent
Yes, I have several LES vps and generally connect to them by v6.  The shared ipv4 addresses have a habit of getting ddos'd.


I mostly don't feel like I need v4 for my own servers except for one running a small web site.  The rest are personal and backend services of various sorts and v6 would be fine for those.  Scaleway.com has a problem right now because they're short of v4 addresses so it's hard to spin up new servers.  v6 would mostly solve that but they don't have it yet.
Interesting and good use of IPv6.  Expected to see LES show up.  Lots of folks like that service.


Ironic that a market disruption like Scaleway with those ARM processors got slapped being short sighted / cheap and IP starved....
 

willie

Active Member
Scaleway is interesting and I'd consider it to be in something like a late beta test right now.  I don't think they can be making money on it but at $10 per server, it wasn't attractive because of the slow cpus.  The next generation of hardware will be more powerful and probably cost more.  To become "real" they have to beef up the infrastructure software considerably, add more hardware, and get ipv6 working.  They may also have to implement something like surge pricing since part of the idea of an on-demand service (hourly billing) is that you can get servers whenever you need them, i.e. they have to price high enough that demand lags supply by a little bit.  That's not such great news for those of us who always want the cheapest possible servers, but at low enough prices all the hardware gets eaten, as Scaleway is experiencing right now.
 

MannDude

Just a dude
vpsBoard Founder
Moderator
Nope. I have no native IPv6 support at home, and haven't felt any pressure to actually utilize it on my servers that include it. Besides doing some very basic server to server IPv6 testing, I've not used it.
 

willie

Active Member
I've been wanting move my ssh daemons to listen on random ipv6 addresses (I mean picked at random from a /64 range and kept secret) so they'd be unfeasible to find by port scanning.  But I haven't done it yet, and have been wondering if there's some mistake in the concept.
 
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wlanboy

Content Contributer
I don't have active IPv6 at home but enabled my router by adding a IPv6 tunnel service (socks on own vps).
Most of the time the IPv6 routes are not as busy as the IPv4 routes. My SFTP transfers are therefore faster.
 

clarity

Active Member
With my U-Verse service, it is active, but the residential gateway kept shutting down. When looking at the logs, it looked like the router was having issues dealing with the IPv6 packets. It was rebooting itself every half hour to hour, and it made it hard to watch anything on television or to stream. I turned it off, and I haven't had the issues since. Hopefully, they can get the issue taken care of, and I can go back to it. It was noticeably faster than IPv4.
 

tr1cky

New Member
My main problem with ipv6 at home is that the capacity that some providers and services use to serve ipv6-content is pretty low.


A good example would be Sony: If you have ipv6 enabled you would download from their network through ipv6, but they seem to have no ressources at all for ipv6 so download speeds go from 12mb/s (on a 100mbps line) to 500kb/s.
 

Awmusic12635

Active Member
Verified Provider
I don't have IPv6 at my college apartment, but my parents do via comcast. 


Have made sure all our server offerings have IPv6.
 

iWF-Jacob

New Member
Verified Provider
My local ISP (municipal fiber) doesn't yet support IPv6, however we have IPv6 on 90% of our shared servers, and whenever a customer wants it on VPS/dedicated :)
 

web-project

Member
Verified Provider
In data centre, yes they do support IPv6 and we actively use it for VPS and shared hosting, but at home no such thing as BT support the IPv4 only at this moment.
 
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