Managed VPS

Matty

New Member
Hello all,

New to the forums so hope I posted it in the correct part.

I'm with my current host and I've had a managed VPS with them for about 2 years, I am happy with the service but there is a massive price difference between the managed VPS and unmanaged VPS.

So my question is as my VPS is setup how I want it to be, do I really need it managed?

I know some basic knowledge about VPS but its mainly about keeping it updated/security.

What is included in a managed VPS? is it as simple as updating software regular?

Thanks
 

Jade

NodeServ
Verified Provider
If it is indeed a fully managed service, then it'll basically include managed services on whatever you needed.
 

Matty

New Member
Yea its fully managed I can either choose managed or unmanaged. but price difference is £30 which seems such a lot. Like I said I have some basic knowledge so I don't really want to pay for something I don't really need.

What do you web hosts do to manage your VPS clients, how can I keep ontop of security/software updates?
 

TruvisT

Server Management Specialist
Verified Provider
Yea its fully managed I can either choose managed or unmanaged. but price difference is £30 which seems such a lot. Like I said I have some basic knowledge so I don't really want to pay for something I don't really need.

What do you web hosts do to manage your VPS clients, how can I keep ontop of security/software updates?
Follow RSS feeds. Setup monitoring. Read news. Learn. Study. ect...

The 30 is worth it if you don't plan to live in the server world.
 

fizzyjoe908

New Member
Verified Provider
Full management usually includes doing anything you ask for. They will update, monitor, configure, install - whatever you want.
 

Matty

New Member
I plan to stay in the server world, want to learn as much as possible. I can install software and do other small commands through SSH. Just need need guiding hand through keeping up with security updates.
 

cubixcloud

Member
Verified Provider
Then get it unmanaged. But know that you will need to fix any issues not included in support yourself or pay your provider too. If you really want to learn fire up a linux or windows vm on oracle virtualbox.
 
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ServerStreet

New Member
You may wish to look for an unmanaged provider that offers managed services hourly so you pay only for what you need. You can also hire a server management company to do hourly work for you.
 

Matty

New Member
Yea true, Its just the service is the best that I have ever used just their support lacks a little as they have grown.

What UK server management company's do you recommend?

Would anyone be willing to share what there daily routine is regarding running a VPS server? (Security/software updates)
 

Hxxx

Active Member
apt-get update; apt-get upgrade ??

And then make sure your web applications stay up to date.
That's only if the OS is debian based. And that is not the only thing to do, there are lots and lots of things that he need to take care off. Don't give such a bad advise.
 

Matty

New Member
That's only if the OS is debian based. And that is not the only thing to do, there are lots and lots of things that he need to take care off. Don't give such a bad advise.
Thanks hrr1963, care to elaborate on what else/other commands I would need?
 

Amfy

New Member
but price difference is £30 which seems such a lot.
Well, it really depends what project this for, but generall 30 bucks is absolutely nothing for managed services. To be honest, we're charging a lot more usually :)

Of course most stuff here is more for hobby usage, so updating is most job to do on the servers. But for a business, it's required to have someone for any kind of issue. I mean managed servers are not for having an updated system, but for having sysadmins that have years or experience, know what to do in all possible situations, etc.
 

wlanboy

Content Contributer
The difference between managed and unmanaged is about the trouble you want to handle.

Example 1:

If my mail server is failing at 4a.m. on Saturday morning - I don't care.

When I am awake I will fix it.

Most email will still arrive.

Example:2

If the mail server used by my family/friends died at 4a.m. on Staturday morning - I do get about 20 calls at 6a.m. about errors and most important emails not get delivered. And hundrets of SMS every 5 minutes if it is allready fixed.

Example 1 is hosted on a 96 MB Ram 10$ per year vps (well I am only renting an IP with sam RAM attached to it).

Example 2 will be hosted on a managed webhosting account the next time something goes wrong because it is not worth the hassle.
Family and clients can drive you nuts.

So the shiny vision is you becoming the linux pro but the not so shine side of the medal is you doing a lot of nasty work at really bad times.
 

maounique

Active Member
@wlanboy

You can also setup redundancy of some sort, across providers and across the world, chances to fail the same time are astronomical.

If I were the OP I would keep the managed server (well, it is a very nice quote for full management) and get a hobby one where I would try to setup a redundant server for the services I have on the managed one. Then, when I am fairly confident change roles the unmanaged becomes primary, then remove the managed and buy another unmanaged for secondary.

The most important part is the security, many times you can have a compromised server without knowing it before it is too late (your host will receive notifications from cops and victims of the crackers which used it for their illegal activities).

I would say security comes first, then you add functionality.

1. Keep your OS up to date;

2. Keep your applications/scripts up to date;

3. Do not run anything you do not need especially DNS/mail servers. If you keep your attack surface low, you are on the good path;

4. Use complex and long passwords on everything. "I will never again use short passwords !" is a good example. Is more secure than Vxg8Hj9pI and much easier to remember. If possible change default ports, for example 22 for SSH or 10000 for virtualmin.

5. Change directory of your admin area on your web-facing script and be very careful with directory permissions. Do not allow write on anything you dont have to.

You should be mostly secure if you follow that simple guide.
 
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wlanboy

Content Contributer
@wlanboy

I would say security comes first, then you add functionality.
1. Keep your OS up to date;

2. Keep your applications/scripts up to date;

3. Do not run anything you do not need especially DNS/mail servers. If you keep your attack surface low, you are on the good path;

4. Use complex and long passwords on everything. "I will never again use short passwords !" is a good example. Is more secure than Vxg8Hj9pI and much easier to remember. If possible change default ports, for example 22 for SSH or 10000 for virtualmin.

5. Change directory of your admin area on your web-facing script and be very careful with directory permissions. Do not allow write on anything you dont have to.

You should be mostly secure if you follow that simple guide.
First point: He will need DNS and Mail. And you should be knowing what you are doing if you want to do that yourself.

I wrote my mail server tutorial after 1.5 years of operating a email server.

Regarding your list:

If it would be only that.

You forgot:

  • Limiting connections
    iptables, fail2ban
  • Keep an eye on what is going on
    logwatch
 

maounique

Active Member
IPT only needed when you need extra functionality, such as blocking some countries or rate-limiting connections. It is a serious problem for newbies to manage those, including with graphical interfaces. fail2ban can also become a problem in itself.

Logwatch is a very good point. Thanks.
 
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ThePrimeHost

New Member
Verified Provider
From my perspective a "Fully Managed VPS" solution should be akin to a reseller hosting account without the reseller account restrictions. You need a firewall installed (CSF / APF) tech support does it. Seeing 500 internal server errors? Submit a ticket and tech support corrects it, etc.

If you're competent in your ability to secure and manage your own server then I see no need for management. If you're coming from a reseller hosting environment and don't really have any experience in the management realm it may be best to choose the fully managed option.
 

Magiobiwan

Insert Witty Statement Here
Verified Provider
Back in the days when I was first considering a Linux VPS, I was wanting a fully managed one. Problematicaly, none allowed root access so I didn't want to purchase. They should let you have root access at the least.
 
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